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Print 75 comment(s) - last by Tony Swash.. on Aug 5 at 12:39 AM


Android's all-star lineup (some of which is pictured here) has propelled it to top RIM (BlackBerry) and Apple (iPhone) in the smartphone market.
Google posts an amazing 886 percent year-to-year growth in sales

When Google's Android mobile OS launched it was met with skepticism, pessimism, and doubt. Slowly but surely, Google recruited new hardware partners, launched new handsets, eventually reaching sales of 65,000 units a day -- then 100,000.  And Google maintained a relentless pace of OS releases -- with such high profile updates as Android 1.5, 2.02.1, and, most recently, 2.2 (Froyo).

Now market researcher Canalys claims that Google is now the top player in the U.S. smartphone market in terms of market share.  According to Canalys's extensive study, Google owns 34 percent of the market compared to Research in Motion's 32 percent and Apple's 21.7 percent.

Propelled by wildly successful handsets like HTC Hero (October 2009), Motorola Droid (November 2009), HTC Droid Incredible (April 2010), HTC EVO 4G (June 2010), and Motorola Droid X (July 2010), Google has dominated the market with an astounding sales growth of 886 percent.

Perhaps the only analogy to what Google is doing in the history of operating systems is Microsoft's incredible conquest of the personal computer operating system market with Windows.  Much like Windows, Google's multi-hardware OEM, open approach, focused on providing customers with a broad array of choices, is crushing its more specialized competitors, like Apple (which ironically was similarly crushed by Microsoft in the PC OS market).

That's not to say that Apple or RIM are posting financial losses.  In fact, Apple grew 61 percent in sales year-to-year and RIM grew 41 percent.  What is happening, though, is that they appear to be missing the growth opportunity that Android has found with its open, third-party hardware model.

Android's success looks especially scary considering that it appears to just be getting warmed up. Android 3.0 "Gingerbread" should launch this holiday season with some pretty amazing new features. Motorola, HTC, and others are reportedly already cooking up new high end handsets to accompany the OS launch.

In terms of individual hardware OEMs, Nokia still is the dominant party, owning 38 percent of the market. Overall smartphone sales rose 64 percent on a year-to-year basis.



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RE: uhh, someone got some number way off....
By omnicronx on 8/3/2010 2:01:35 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
So yes, congratulations to Google, but Any-ONE-Single Droid maker is not making the NET Dollars that Apple is making which in the business world is all that actually matters.
It matters to Apple, and those who own Apple stock.

Please explain to me as a consumer, how does having multiple manufacturers constantly competing against one another constitute as a bad thing?

Android is now selling better than the iPhone, there is no taking away from that.

FYI: Are you seriously calling out 'Android Fanboys'? Your entire post is completely bias.


RE: uhh, someone got some number way off....
By Tony Swash on 8/4/2010 12:57:55 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Android is now selling better than the iPhone, there is no taking away from that.


Right there you have a problem. You, like many here, are comparing a hardware platform (iPhone) with an OS (Android).

Wouldn't it be more accurate to compare an OS with an OS?

In which case you should compare iOS with Android and that means including all the iPod Touches and iPads sold and that changes the comparative figures quite a lot.

Apple has very deliberately gone about creating a versatile touch based OS than can run on lots of hardware platforms beyond just phones. This means for developers its just one big potential market, creating an iPad or iPod touch version of your iPhone app is very trivial.

Having the biggest developer community, the most apps, the most profitable market for developers (which Apple currently has) may not mean your OS ends up being the biggest but it probably means that iOS will be a very big player for a long while yet and it may end up being a critical strategic advantage. Time will tell.

There will probably be some Android based tablets and perhaps other devices in the near future and if there are then the figures for those devices should be included in the total for Android.


RE: uhh, someone got some number way off....
By themaster08 on 8/4/2010 3:40:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
In which case you should compare iOS with Android and that means including all the iPod Touches and iPads sold and that changes the comparative figures quite a lot.
quote:
Android is New Smartphone Market Leader
The iPad and iPod touch are not smartphones, so no.


By Tony Swash on 8/5/2010 12:39:18 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
quote:
In which case you should compare iOS with Android and that means including all the iPod Touches and iPads sold and that changes the comparative figures quite a lot.
quote:
Android is New Smartphone Market Leader
The iPad and iPod touch are not smartphones, so no.


Either you compare hardware (i.e. phones) or you compare OS (i.e. iOS and Anroid).

If you compare phones you should compare models against models. Why lump models made by different companies together just because they all use variations of the same OS (i.e Android)?

That would only make sense if what you are actually lumping together, what you consider the significant factor, is the OS that those phones run, in which case you should lump together the iOS devices. Seems logical to me.

Surely the point of all this commentary, the reason the figures profiled in the article are significant, is because some people think that the relative size of different segments of the phone market is significant. If so then compare different phones. If the significant factor is the relative market size of different OS then compare OS.

Let me ask you this - if and when Android starts to appear on devices other than phones would you consider the data about the number of such devices sold to be relevant to the question of the overall success or market weight of Android? Genuine question.


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