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Apple's jailbreaking-free dreamland, where its customers are safe from the evils of jailbreaking.  (Source: Free Webs)
Company says it needs you not to jailbreak to keep you safe

Apple really cares about you.  That's why it fought so long and hard to prevent you from jailbreaking your iPhone and running unauthorized apps, or unlocking your SIM card and jumping to another network.  In fact, it only tried to brick your unlocked phone because it is so concerned about whether you're having a quality experience.  

Or, at least that's the line Apple's spokeswoman was trying to sell in the wake of the legalization of jailbreaking, based on revisions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act by researchers at the Library of Congress.

Apple released for following statement to
Cult of Mac:

Apple’s goal has always been to insure that our customers have a great experience with their iPhone and we know that jailbreaking can severely degrade the experience. As we’ve said before, the vast majority of customers do not jailbreak their iPhones as this can violate the warranty and can cause the iPhone to become unstable and not work reliably.

Apple's spokeswoman confirms that while the government may say its legal, jailbreaking violates your warranty -- but only because the company cares so much about your experience.  She commented that the company hadn't yet filed any suits against makers of jailbreaking or SIM unlocking software.

While Apple obviously isn't happy with the changes, underground iPhone developers like George Hotz and the iPhone Dev Team are rejoicing.  The change means they will have the opportunity to sell their jailbreaking/unlocking tools more openly, rather than merely seeking donations.  They can also rest easy that they are unlikely to be prosecuted for their efforts.

The shift is also beneficial for Cydia.  Cydia, an underground app store specializing in safe unauthorized apps (such as tethering apps), has been picking up steam of late.  It services the estimated millions of jailbroken iPhones in the wild.



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Makes sense
By Spivonious on 7/27/2010 10:21:16 AM , Rating: 5
"You can jailbreak your phone, but don't expect us to support you anymore."

Makes sense to me. If you bought a Toyota and installed a turbocharger, Toyota is not going to fix your car when the drivetrain blows up.




RE: Makes sense
By damianrobertjones on 7/27/2010 10:22:18 AM , Rating: 2
Yes they will. For a charge.


RE: Makes sense
By Spivonious on 7/27/2010 10:49:31 AM , Rating: 5
Obviously I was implying warranty work.


RE: Makes sense
By Souka on 7/27/2010 11:52:10 AM , Rating: 5
Imagine this scenario...You did put a Turbo charger into your Toyota and sometime later Toyotar sent a "Kill" command so the car wouldn't start.

I suspect Toyota would find itself being sued...and having to undo the "Kill" command quite quickly...

Always makes me groan when I hear Apple bricks phones....


RE: Makes sense
By mindless1 on 7/27/2010 4:24:41 PM , Rating: 4
A better analogy would be that if you put aftermarket tires on your car or fuzzy dice inside and the engine breaks, that IS covered under warranty.

Software doesn't (usually) break hardware.


RE: Makes sense
By sprockkets on 7/27/2010 8:58:25 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
A better analogy would be that if you put aftermarket tires on your car or fuzzy dice inside and the engine breaks, that IS covered under warranty.


Uh no.

A better analogy would be reflashing the ICU of the car permitting you to bypass the governor and re-time the engine ignition for better performance at the cost of engine wear.


RE: Makes sense
By dsumanik on 7/28/2010 10:37:45 AM , Rating: 5
Uh No:

jailkbreaking your iphone does not cause "engine" or CPU wear...you can flash it back to legit IOS in a matter of minutes with zero detectable changes/side effects.

Toyota cannot void my warranty for modifying my car/truck in such a way that it does not change/harm the mechanical function of the vehicle. Saying my engine warranty is voided because I wanted a custom paint job is rediculous.

to better complete your analogy:

Installing a turbo/running an ignition advancer would be comparable to OVERCLOCKING the CPU on an iPhone...which even still would in reality only hurt battery longevity....the simple act of jailbreaking/unlocking DOES NOT overclock your iphone.

A locked cellphone is a tool for a large corporation to monopolize and gouge a consumer base.

Imagine buying a toyota and only being able to use toyota brand gas on a se 3yr contract term...that you have to pay for each month, regardless of whether you burn all the gas or not.

Wake up people thats what these guys are trying to do to us.

I bought my first unlocked iphone 3gs last year and it has saved me massive amounts of money, and whenever I have a problem with my provider and threaten to switch at first they try to tell me about cancellation fees and that its against my contract to do this and that...then i simply mention my phone is unlocked... the guy starts saying sorry for this and that and all of a sudden i get transferred to the "cancellation department" and an amazingly cheap deal that i can't tell anyone about gets offered to me.

sprockkets,

please go back to the apple viral marketing dept and slurp on mr jobs' wang till your tummy feels better.... jailbreaking / unlocking helps the world by giving users and choice and as a side effect, saves everyone money.

Eff you and the rest of the apple wankers even remotely for trying to stand behind apple on this one.


RE: Makes sense
By sprockkets on 7/28/2010 6:14:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Uh No: jailkbreaking your iphone does not cause "engine" or CPU wear...you can flash it back to legit IOS in a matter of minutes with zero detectable changes/side effects.


But it allows you to, and that's the whole point. All bets are off. Same thing with Buffalo routers. They pre install DD-WRT on it but without the ability to overdrive the wireless transmitter to save on wear and tear.

quote:
Toyota cannot void my warranty for modifying my car/truck in such a way that it does not change/harm the mechanical function of the vehicle. Saying my engine warranty is voided because I wanted a custom paint job is rediculous.


Never said that or implied it. Strawman.

quote:
Installing a turbo/running an ignition advancer would be comparable to OVERCLOCKING the CPU on an iPhone...which even still would in reality only hurt battery longevity....the simple act of jailbreaking/unlocking DOES NOT overclock your iphone.


But it could allow it. And if the thermal envelope is exceeded, damage or premature wear might happen. Besides, talk to any Android owners who overclock their Droid for better performance; it apparently is a driver for them to "root" their phones.

quote:
A locked cellphone is a tool for a large corporation to monopolize and gouge a consumer base.


Not really. Most are willing to sell you the phone without a contract.

Here's a real life example: Nissan allowed owners of the GTR to take off all the safeties of their car so as to allow hi rev starts. You had to sign a waiver which stated if any damage occurred, the warranty would not cover it.

But since we live in a web enabled world, owners found out how to activate that mode on their own. Then one owner blew out the transmission. They found out he deactivated the safeties. Due to the nature of the trasmission, it costs $17 thousand dollars to replace.

Guess what? Due to the whole debacle of it, Nissan no longer sells the GTR with the ability to disable the safeties.

Notice how it became a problem only when people broke through the lock Nissan had in place.

Putting on third party firmware is great, giving you features and abilities that the carrier didn't want you to have. Now imagine if everyone had the ability to tether, share their connection via wifi, and now causes the network to drag.

quote:
Imagine buying a toyota and only being able to use toyota brand gas on a se 3yr contract term...that you have to pay for each month, regardless of whether you burn all the gas or not.


Ever heard of people leasing cars and how excessive wear and tear is not allowed unless you want to pay for damage? If you chose to subsidize your phone via a carrier expect them to at least get something back on the contract.

Apple and Att never unlocking the iphone in the us does suck. Instead of a temporary 3 year reprieve on the practice of jail breaking, why not make it the law to force carriers to unlock your phone after the contract?

quote:
I bought my first unlocked iphone 3gs last year and it has saved me massive amounts of money, and whenever I have a problem with my provider and threaten to switch at first they try to tell me about cancellation fees and that its against my contract to do this and that...then i simply mention my phone is unlocked... the guy starts saying sorry for this and that and all of a sudden i get transferred to the "cancellation department" and an amazingly cheap deal that i can't tell anyone about gets offered to me.


Good for you. You also paid much more than $200 for it. Fair is fair.

quote:
sprockkets, please go back to the apple viral marketing dept and slurp on mr jobs' wang till your tummy feels better.... jailbreaking / unlocking helps the world by giving users and choice and as a side effect, saves everyone money.


Ad hominem and another strawman. I own no apple products and never will.

quote:
Eff you and the rest of the apple wankers even remotely for trying to stand behind apple on this one.


Funny how emotional you get over an analogy.


RE: Makes sense
By sprockkets on 7/28/2010 6:24:27 PM , Rating: 2
Oh, and this bit is classic:

quote:
I bought my first unlocked iphone 3gs last year and it...


Funny how you tell me I suck SJ wang when you actually own an iphone and I don't. Tell me, who's really gives a BJ to SJ?


RE: Makes sense
By chick0n on 7/27/2010 8:57:36 PM , Rating: 2
Actually they would.

Look at Scion, if you install their TRD supercharger, your warranty still works.

Just saying.


RE: Makes sense
By sprockkets on 7/27/2010 9:01:32 PM , Rating: 3
Yes, but it's their officially backed turbo, and they have to install it.

Mazda also has 3 different levels of warranty to their Mazdaspeed products. Some have no warranty, while others are 100% backed.


RE: Makes sense
By quiksilvr on 7/27/2010 10:38:48 AM , Rating: 2
You could just remove the turbocharger and said it was spontaneous combustion.

Just like jail-breaking. You can just unjail-break it and revert it back to its original OS.


RE: Makes sense
By Spivonious on 7/27/2010 10:50:26 AM , Rating: 5
Sure you could, but that would be unethical and fraud.


RE: Makes sense
By Noya on 7/27/10, Rating: 0
RE: Makes sense
By bupkus on 7/27/2010 12:55:41 PM , Rating: 5
Whatever happened to the idea that the customer was always right?

Now the customer is simply cattle consuming whatever corn product is placed before them to become a willing, confused, frightened component for a formula to transfer wealth to the top.

Well... at least they can't eat us.


RE: Makes sense
By psaus42 on 7/27/2010 2:42:12 PM , Rating: 2
Not yet, at least.

... I hear the wealthy frown on Tabasco... stock up, develop your tolerance, and baste yourself come Thanksgiving 2013. :-P


RE: Makes sense
By quiksilvr on 7/27/2010 12:09:53 PM , Rating: 1
RE: Makes sense
By omnicronx on 7/27/2010 12:10:37 PM , Rating: 5
Yes... because doing something against Apples EULA is automatically unethical and fraud..

Apple could amend rules that stated that your first born child belongs to them if you jailbreak you phone, that does not make it legally binding in any way or form..

Apple has not brought any of these jailbreakers to court, because its very likely that they will not win. Apple has never been afraid to litigate in the past when they know they have a case, why would this be any different?


RE: Makes sense
By bupkus on 7/27/2010 1:02:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Apple could amend rules that stated that your first born child belongs to them if you jailbreak you phone, that does not make it legally binding in any way or form..
Don't give them any ideas!

Whenever business found laws inconvenient and they could afford a powerful lobby they made no excuses about paying off politicians to change the law.


RE: Makes sense
By knutjb on 7/27/2010 4:15:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Yes... because doing something against Apples EULA is automatically unethical and fraud..
So you always break contracts you enter...
quote:
Apple has not brought any of these jailbreakers to court, because its very likely that they will not win. Apple has never been afraid to litigate in the past when they know they have a case, why would this be any different?
Apple will go to court when they deem jailbreaking is hurting their bottom line, currently its an annoyance and I'm sure they are just using the jailbreakers to find holes in the OS. Lawyers and going to court is very expensive, even when you have $45B cash sitting in the bank.


RE: Makes sense
By mindless1 on 7/27/10, Rating: 0
RE: Makes sense
By mindless1 on 7/27/10, Rating: 0
RE: Makes sense
By superPC on 7/27/2010 10:51:43 AM , Rating: 2
Unfortunately you can't do that to a jailbroken iphone. If jail breaking somehow caused a hardware failure, than your iphone won't be able to work. how can you unjailbreak an iphone if you can't get it to work?

The original poster got it right. do it at your own risk and live with it. of course you could still get it repaired for a fee.


RE: Makes sense
By omnicronx on 7/27/2010 12:02:06 PM , Rating: 3
If it gets to the point where you have a massive hardware error, then unless Apple takes out the embedded memory and looks to see what is on it, how exactly are they going to know its jailbroken?

In the situations where you have a hardware issue on a working phone, i.e perhaps GPS or motion sensors break, you could merely unjailbreak your phone and get support and Apple would be none the wiser.

Now of course there will be some situations where you will be SOL, perhaps your device is stuck in a looping state, but in many situations you are free and clear to merely wipe your phone and send it in.+


RE: Makes sense
By bupkus on 7/27/2010 1:05:37 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
You can just unjail-break it and revert it back to its original OS.
You can just unjail-break it and revert it back to its original iSin. Fixed.


RE: Makes sense
By DuctTapeAvenger on 7/27/2010 10:59:23 AM , Rating: 2
Maybe not all Apple Stores are the same, but the one I used to go to said that you can Jailbreak your phone all you want. They will just blow it all away and upgrade your phone back to the latest version of the OS and hand your phone back to you, and tell you to come back if you are still having issues.


RE: Makes sense
By NorthernYankee on 7/27/2010 11:00:49 AM , Rating: 3
Yes that is true but there is more to it. There is a Federal Law called the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which states that the warrantor must prove that the modification cause the failure.

So for your analogy of the Turbo, yes they could deny warranty on the drivetrain, but if your power windows broke they would still have to fix that under warranty.

So going back to apple, now what I am saying is hypothetical and would probably have to be challenged in court, but if you jailbreak and say the Home button stopped working they would have a hard time saying that a jailbreak caused that. So with these changes to the DMCA invalidating your entire warranty due to a jailbreak might not be legal.


RE: Makes sense
By omnicronx on 7/27/2010 12:15:40 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly, for the vast majority of jailbreakers, rooting your phone should not be causing any extra stress to the hardware.

Now of course if Apple could say prove your were OC'ing your phone, then of course you should be denied warranty, but I would find it hard to believe that Apple could ever prove that getting root access to a unix based device can do harm in the vast majority of cases.


RE: Makes sense
By Iaiken on 7/27/2010 2:09:16 PM , Rating: 2
Thank you for posting this so that I didn't have to.

This is the same in both American and Canadian consumer law.

Even in the case of the turbo "example", they would actually have to prove that the modification is directly responsible for the failure. You would need to go pretty far overboard with the boost in order to experience such a failure at which point it serves you right. If your jail breaking software also overclocks the processor to 1Ghz then it serves you right.

A more reasonable parallel would be putting a better air intake and exhaust on your car to free up the engine a bit more. In this case, the warrantor will find it utterly impossible to blame a failed engine gasket on your modification. Likewise, most of these jailbreakers leave the hardware alone, they just open up root access and the ability to install applications that Apple has PooPoo'd.


RE: Makes sense
By Sazar on 7/27/2010 6:21:30 PM , Rating: 2
How is adding a turbo-charger the same as jail-breaking the phone?

If Apple has on issues allowing you to run another OS on their hard-ware (their desktops/notebooks), it is not that much different jailbreaking your phone to allow added functionality, except Apple doesn't want you to do it.

Honestly, unless someone is overclocking the phone's processor or making it do something it is not designed for hardware-wise, support should remain unchanged. This is probably why they said it CAN lead to your phone not being supported, not that it will definitely not be supported.


RE: Makes sense
By HighWing on 7/28/2010 11:22:41 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Makes sense to me. If you bought a Toyota and installed a turbocharger, Toyota is not going to fix your car when the drivetrain blows up.


Actually if you bought a TRD Supercharger, and it was installed by a dealer or cert Toyota installer, they will cover it, and I am talking about aftermarket here.

But not a non TRD Turbocharger...


RE: Makes sense
By rika13 on 7/29/2010 5:42:02 AM , Rating: 2
If I were to buy a Prius, slap in a big block Chevy with a pair of Hollies and a big blower sticking out of the hood, and then have an issue with the radio, Toyota is required to fix the radio. They are not required to perform work on the engine and may refuse to perform work on the drivetrain IF they can show my modifications were at fault for the problem (said big block tears the tiny transmission in half).


"There's no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance." -- Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer














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