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Print 48 comment(s) - last by quiksilvr.. on Jul 21 at 2:14 PM


  (Source: Alternative Resource Energy)
Could cut greenhouse gas emissions by 86 percent

Keeping in line with the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) revealed that it will need 800 million gallons of biodiesel in the United States domestic market in 2011.

The EISA "expanded" the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS2), which has volume requirements for Biomass-based Diesel, undifferentiated Advanced Biofuels and Cellulosic Biofuels. Biodiesel is the only commercially accepted U.S.-made Advanced Biofuel that fits the description of an undifferentiated Advanced Biofuel and Biomass-based diesel, and it can cut greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 86 percent when made from animal fats, agricultural oils, and waste greases. 

The EPA, under the RFS2 program, must determine applicable percentage standards "for each compliance year prior to November 30" of the year before, and then publishes it. Today's published document from the EPA has initiated the finalization of this rule and will kickstart the 2011 volume requirements provided by the RFS2.

"We applaud EPA for this announcement and for reaffirming the common sense notion that we should displace petroleum diesel fuel with Advanced Biofuels like biodiesel," said Manning Feraci, Vice President of Federal Affairs for the National Biodiesel Board. "This notice demonstrates to all actors in the fuels marketplace that the volume goals for Biomass-based Diesel provided for by law in the RFS2 program will be met and that 800 million gallons of biodiesel must be used in 2011."

The EPA hopes to mix 13.95 billion gallons of biofuels into the fuel supply, which is a total of 7.95 percent of all fuel used by U.S. vehicles. This is an increase of 1 billion gallons from the 2010 target of 12.95 billion gallons, and of this total, 800 million gallons of biodiesel must be mixed into the United States' overall diesel supply. 

Biofuel producers are concerned with whether these production levels can be reached due to biodiesel prices being much more expensive than regular diesel. Producers would like to see Congress pass a $1 per gallon biodiesel tax once again, since it expired last year, in order to make biodiesel more affordable. 



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RE: eh
By mattclary on 7/20/2010 8:43:15 AM , Rating: 2
That might actually be true. If you think about it, all that waste would probably produce CO2 and methane when it decomposed in a land fill, but if you can convert it to fuel, your net gain is not having produced the same emissions from already sequestered carbon (in fossil fuels).

I'm no tree hugger, but sure, why not, if it's economical.


RE: eh
By quiksilvr on 7/20/10, Rating: 0
RE: eh
By chunkymonster on 7/20/10, Rating: -1
RE: eh
By FITCamaro on 7/20/2010 12:14:18 PM , Rating: 5
Not really sure why this post and the one above it were rated down.

I'm 100% on board with biodiesel. Just not government mandates that don't pay attention to market feasibility. I don't care what the biodiesel is made of. Hemp works just as well as anything else. Of course my favorite way is algae. Or out of hippies who think there needs to be less people on the planet.


RE: eh
By Uncle on 7/20/2010 8:46:39 PM , Rating: 2
This is just another way to pay the farmers to grow some more surplus corn, or not surplus corn, to take the surplus off the food chain to keep the corn prices high, and to make sure Monsanto gets their share because they produce the seeds.


RE: eh
By quiksilvr on 7/21/2010 2:14:29 PM , Rating: 2
I think we need less stupid people on the planet. I'm an intellicist. The first step is admitting it.


RE: eh
By ebaycj on 7/20/2010 12:41:28 PM , Rating: 2
Lumber/Logging companies are also against it. They like cutting down trees to make paper.


RE: eh
By Ammohunt on 7/20/2010 2:10:36 PM , Rating: 2
And we all know what happend to Jamestown..panama red


RE: eh
By mattclary on 7/20/2010 9:30:43 AM , Rating: 2
Corn is used to make ethanol, not bio-diesel. Although, corm waste probably could be used. Husks and such...


RE: eh
By quiksilvr on 7/20/2010 11:22:16 AM , Rating: 3
Exactly. Research has been done on using algae and some form of wheat as well, but I would rather we don't use food as fuel.


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