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  (Source: Slice of MIT)
America continues pushing toward cleaner energy today

The UN-supported organization, Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21), conducted a study that shows half of new power generated in the United States in 2009 was renewable energy.

The U.S. has taken great strides toward mass use of renewable energy. Just last year, 10 gigawatts of wind power capacity was installed in the United States, which can power 2.4 million homes. Other advancements in clean energy were made last year as well, such as the $7 million grant for Argonne National Laboratory from the U.S. Department of Energy to further solar power research.

More recently, the Obama Administration has continued contributing funds to keep renewable energy research rolling along. In April, the U.S. government approved the country's first off-shore wind farm, despite those who protested the idea, and just this month, Obama gave a hefty sum of $1.85 billion for new solar energy plants to be built around the U.S.  In addition, a promising 73 percent of Americans want to cut fossil fuel dependency in favor of cleaner methods. 

While the U.S. is moving along in regards to green technology, other countries around the world have been joining the revolution for a cleaner planet too by implementing new ideas in green technology. 

In Europe, 60 percent of new power generation in 2009 was in the form of renewable energy. But China has made the most progress when it comes to green technology by manufacturing more solar panels and wind turbines than any other country, as well as adding of 37 gigawatts of renewable energy to China's overall power generation capacity. Worldwide, renewable energy accounts for 25 percent of total power generation and provided 18 percent of the Earth's electricity in 2009. 

Despite these strides in the growing use of renewable energy, the U.S. has a long way to go before they accomplish the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of having 20 percent of America's power derived from wind by 2030.



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RE: Renewable...
By guffwd13 on 7/16/2010 5:22:22 PM , Rating: 0
I agree with your definition of economical, but we seem to disagree on relative costs.

My second point is that in ten to twenty years, if you want cheaper energy (inflation accounted for), you won't get it from oil. I don't know where you're getting the idea that running alternative energy sources requires a subsidy, because it doesn't. Not even today. The government steps in today to stimulate the growth of the industry because their is too much risk for the market to naturally do it itself. The government mediates that risk by "throwing" money at it.

Alternative energy has already proven to be cheaper and in the long run will be far cheaper than oil has and could ever be. This is an example where a free market system doesn't always work because it would rather keep the system as it is rather than proceed forward to bigger and better things.


"Young lady, in this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!" -- Homer Simpson














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