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  (Source: Slice of MIT)
America continues pushing toward cleaner energy today

The UN-supported organization, Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21), conducted a study that shows half of new power generated in the United States in 2009 was renewable energy.

The U.S. has taken great strides toward mass use of renewable energy. Just last year, 10 gigawatts of wind power capacity was installed in the United States, which can power 2.4 million homes. Other advancements in clean energy were made last year as well, such as the $7 million grant for Argonne National Laboratory from the U.S. Department of Energy to further solar power research.

More recently, the Obama Administration has continued contributing funds to keep renewable energy research rolling along. In April, the U.S. government approved the country's first off-shore wind farm, despite those who protested the idea, and just this month, Obama gave a hefty sum of $1.85 billion for new solar energy plants to be built around the U.S.  In addition, a promising 73 percent of Americans want to cut fossil fuel dependency in favor of cleaner methods. 

While the U.S. is moving along in regards to green technology, other countries around the world have been joining the revolution for a cleaner planet too by implementing new ideas in green technology. 

In Europe, 60 percent of new power generation in 2009 was in the form of renewable energy. But China has made the most progress when it comes to green technology by manufacturing more solar panels and wind turbines than any other country, as well as adding of 37 gigawatts of renewable energy to China's overall power generation capacity. Worldwide, renewable energy accounts for 25 percent of total power generation and provided 18 percent of the Earth's electricity in 2009. 

Despite these strides in the growing use of renewable energy, the U.S. has a long way to go before they accomplish the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of having 20 percent of America's power derived from wind by 2030.



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RE: Renewable...
By guffwd13 on 7/16/2010 3:23:32 PM , Rating: 1
Actually its not true. People are willing to pay more for green energy. There's a checkbox on my energy statements that for an additional 10% you can request that your "energy "allotment" come from renewable sources. According to the company, 20% of households signed on after only 11 months of the program being offered.

Now, whether or not the allotment is coming from a renewable source is another story, but it does say people are willing to pay more for renewable energy - both that the company offered it in the first place and that people agreed to it.

Plus oil is only more economical at the moment because of quantity. Quantity goes up -> cost goes down. Once solar panels and windfarms become the norm, they'll be cheaper and require less maintenance than the complicated processes and safety overhead involved in the burning of fossil fuels.


RE: Renewable...
By Kurz on 7/16/2010 4:37:33 PM , Rating: 3
Nothing I said was untrue.
'Some' people are willing to pay for more green energy is not a majority of americans (I can extend this to majority of the world). Those who could afford to pay extra for renewable sources have the ability to overpay for their energy. This doesn't mean its economic. Since economic definition is all about only paying as much as the going rate for a unit of energy, good, service.

Overpaying is your decision and yours alone. Overpaying is not considered economical.


RE: Renewable...
By guffwd13 on 7/16/10, Rating: 0
RE: Renewable...
By gunzac21 on 7/18/2010 7:32:51 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Since economic definition is all about only paying as much as the going rate for a unit of energy, good, service.

not true it about finding the balance between a widget's utility to you versus its price versus the standing of other widgets in that paradigm. and no economist that is being completely honest with you will tell you that oil is necessarily cheaper, you of course know about externalities?
the guy who is welling to pay more hard money for cleaner fuel probably just has a better understanding of the externalities of non-sustainable energy types.

ps. unrelated but if it is all about price why do so many companies concentrate on "brand" just saying real economics is not as simple as 8,9,10 or 12th grade math. in fact much of it isn't math at all.


RE: Renewable...
By Kurz on 7/19/2010 1:18:51 AM , Rating: 2
Oil is cheaper since it contains so much energy and is a great storage of energy. While with Solar/wind the energy isn't stored we are absorbing it as it comes in with no meaningful way of storing the energy.

I do know about externalities and for the most part Oil is better than burning coal for example, since it doesn't release so much particulates into the atmosphere. Even though the costs are not realized when you buy the oil up front you still will pay for it further down the line. The sway of prices is so flexible and covers so many areas. For my house filter I use a Hepa filters to screen out the externality that is the dust. The dust bothers me enough to lower my productivity hence why many people view pollution control as a good thing.

Brand is an image to distinguish yourself from the competition in the market place. It helps you have a band of loyal customers. Though as soon as a competitor comes along to offer a superior product for equal or less money, people will jump ship.


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