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Consumer Reports points to reception issues

The body blows just keep coming for Apple and its iPhone 4. The iPhone 4 was unveiled to much fanfare at beginning of June, but once customers started receiving their phones, problems began being reported.

Customers first started complaining about yellowed screens, problems with the proximity sensor, and issues with reception due to the external antenna on the iPhone 4. The latter problem has resulted in a class action lawsuit against both Apple and AT&T.

Earlier this month during lab testing, Consumer Reports stated that "there's no reason, at least yet, to forgo buying an iPhone 4 over its reception concerns."

Today, however, it is reversing its stance after testing more phones in a radio frequency (RF) isolation chamber. Consumer Reports' findings pretty much mirror what everyone has been stating for the past several weeks with regards to the iPhone 4's reception woes. "When your finger or hand touches a spot on the phone's lower left side—an easy thing, especially for lefties—the signal can significantly degrade enough to cause you to lose your connection altogether if you're in an area with a weak signal," said Mike Gikas on the Consumer Reports blog. "Due to this problem, we can't recommend the iPhone 4."

Gikas goes on to state that an unsightly fix for the reception issue is to put a piece of tape over the gap between the Wi-Fi/Bluetooth and cellular radio antennas.

The iPhone 4 was rated highly due to its sharp Retina display, Face Time video chat, and its stellar battery life, but the lingering reception issues mean that the phone won't be getting the recommended rating.

"Apple needs to come up with a permanent—and free—fix for the antenna problem before we can recommend the iPhone 4," Gikas concluded.


Updated 7/12/2010 @ 9:54 pm

Engadget is reporting that Apple is now deleting all references to the Consumer Reports posting from its discussions forums...

 



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RE: Just buy a Microcell.
By djc208 on 7/13/2010 7:23:34 AM , Rating: 4
But Google provides you with services and content for free in return. You can have your e-mail, calender, pictures, videos, directions, news, and even phone calls through Google for free, (or small fees if you want more space/services). Even Android is free to the phone developers. In return they get to monitor what you do on their network over their system, in order to sell advertising.

Apple makes you buy their phone, then insists that for you have the priveledge of buying apps, music, and video through their network you have to tell them where you are so they can make more money off you by pushing advertising to your phone on your dime.

So Apple makes money off the phone, they probably get something back from the cell plan, they make money off the apps/music/video in the app-store, and now their going to make money selling adds to their own mini-billboards.


RE: Just buy a Microcell.
By mcnabney on 7/13/2010 3:29:54 PM , Rating: 2
Apple gets a big chunk of the data plan that AT&T charges. This backend cost is what borked the original deal with Verizon.

Blocking Flash forces iPhone users to purchase everything through the App store instead of using Flash-enabled games off of the web.

There is nothing wrong with this. It is just business. It is only disappointing because the iSheep are distorting the market by allowing a single business to bend rules that are strictly held to others.


"The whole principle [of censorship] is wrong. It's like demanding that grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't have steak." -- Robert Heinlein














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