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Shortage of Samsung touchscreens are hampering EVO 4G sales

HTC has a string of hits on its hands when it comes to Android-based smartphones. The Droid Incredible, which was introduced back in early June, is still hard to come by due to component shortages and Verizon's website says that new stock won't come in until August 9.

It now appears that another HTC phone is being held back by component shortages: the Sprint's EVO 4G. According to the Wall Street Journal, the main holdup in EVO 4G production comes from the Samsung touchscreens that are used on the smartphone. To make matters worse, Samsung won't have additional production capacity for touchscreens until its new factory is completed in 2012.

Whereas Verizon has a date set in stone for when it will receive additional stock of Droid Incredible smartphones, Sprint simply states on its site:

Sorry, this device is so hot we can’t keep it on our virtual shelves. Check back later – more are on their way!

The EVO 4G is the first smartphone available to U.S. customers with 4G connectivity. Sprint is also currently the only major wireless provider in the United States to offer limited 4G connectivity (courtesy of WiMAX), but larger rivals Verizon and AT&T are quickly moving to ready their competing networks.

"We thought we would have more of a head start than we'll end up having," said Sprint CEO Dan Hesse.

Verizon has begun user trials of its LTE 4G service in five cities and is expected to have the service available in 25 to 30 markets by the end of the year covering 100 million people.

AT&T is reading its LTE network for a late 2010/early 2011 launch.



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RE: artificial shortage?
By retrospooty on 7/12/2010 8:37:53 AM , Rating: 1
I doubt it. Samsung makes money off these screens. Samsung phones dont sell as fast as the latest greatest Android phones, if Samsung even sells a phone that uses this same screen they would probably make more money selling it to HTC than putting it in their own phones.

The shortage is most likely the recession. Companies are scared to death of getting stuck with excess inventory, so the whole parts planning is a nightmare these days. Any phone sells more than expected and its tough to react quickly.


RE: artificial shortage?
By Gungel on 7/12/2010 8:52:48 AM , Rating: 2
Well, Samsung was in hot water before for its anti competitiveness in the LCD business. When you own the market it's easy to play foul with your competitors.


RE: artificial shortage?
By retrospooty on 7/12/2010 9:02:05 AM , Rating: 2
Its possible, but if an EVO doesnt sell, its not likely Samsung that benefits. Its Apple, Moto, Nokia Palm etc. (not to mention other HTC phones) Samsung phones arent high sellers.

Not selling LCD's for a hot selling phone, while its still hot hurts Samsung as much as it hurts HTC.


RE: artificial shortage?
By theapparition on 7/12/2010 9:59:44 AM , Rating: 3
I disagree with you. The Samsung Galaxy S class of Android phones are coming to all major providers (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, TMobile and even some low cost providers).

That phone will be a direct competitor to the Incredible, EVO and Droid X.


RE: artificial shortage?
By vapore0n on 7/12/2010 9:00:34 AM , Rating: 2
I think recession doesn't apply to the phone business(See iphone sales) Unless you release some crap like the Kin


RE: artificial shortage?
By retrospooty on 7/13/2010 8:44:17 AM , Rating: 2
Its not about phones stock... Its about LCD stock, and I bet you dollars to doughnuts that the issue is Samsung not being able to get parts from their vendors, panels, flex, ic's etc.


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