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Print 45 comment(s) - last by Saist.. on Jul 10 at 6:42 AM

The V8 formerly known as Hemi will continue as the 5.7-liter V8

In the heyday of the muscle car era, the Hemi in the Plymouth and other Mopar muscle cars was one of the most desired power plants on the car market. As the fuel crisis of the 70's heated up, the Hemi eventually died out with the other gas guzzling power plants of the late 60's and very early 70's.

When Chrysler decided to revamp its image and appeal to buyers who wanted more power (and remembered the Mopar Hemi engine from the muscle car era), the automaker brought the Hemi back to the market. Many will recall the commercial featuring the pair of rednecks asking, "That thing got a Hemi?" that helped cars and trucks packing the engine to sell very well for Chrysler.

The problem today with the image of the Hemi is that many consumers and automakers are now starting to focus on green vehicles with better fuel economy and less focus on performance and power. With the entire image of the Hemi built on power and performance, Chrysler is now reportedly retiring the Hemi moniker again.

The Wall Street Journal reports that some dealers have stated that the Hemi name is being retired, but the 5.7-liter V8 engine that bears the name will live on in cars and trucks. Rather than the vehicles wearing the Hemi badge and marketing, the vehicles will simply be sold with a 5.7-liter V8.

The WSJ reports that the retirement of the Hemi name is a reflection of the changes being made under the new management from Fiat with more focus on fuel economy and features making the vehicles using the V8 easier on the wallet and environment. One of the features that will be touted is displacement reduction that can turn off cylinders when not needed to improve fuel economy. 

Unlike Chrysler, Ford is reviving its famous performance name “5.0” for its new 2011 Mustang. The new Mustang GT gets a potent 5.0-liter V8 engine with 412 hp and very impressive fuel economy offering power and green features in one package while the new V6 packs in V8 levels of performance while sipping fuel.



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RE: All I want...
By Mitch101 on 7/8/2010 9:59:29 AM , Rating: 3
I would imagine no if you could get away with a 1000lb sedan with 12 horse power that does 0-60 in a week.

Ive seen plenty of people with far superior mathematical skills outline why this doesn't exist.

From a business perspective I would say that if one car manufacturer could pull it off they would produce it to rule all other manufacturers.

Mythbusters also did an episode on 100mpg car myths.


RE: All I want...
By ghost03 on 7/8/2010 12:31:14 PM , Rating: 5
Some quick math to back you up Mitch:

Energy Density of Gasoline:
~130 MJ/gallon

Power to cruise at 65 MPH in a mid-size sedan (cruise, !not! accelerate):
~30 HP -> ~22.5 kW

Energy required for sedan to travel for an hour at 65 MPH (note that 1 watt = 1 joule/second):
22.5w * 10^3 * 60^2 = 81 MJ

Scale that into terms we're all familiar with:
130 MJ / 81 MJ = 1.6
1.6 * 65 MPG = 104 MPG.

In theory, the *maximum possible* mileage for a mid size sedan on the interstate is ~100 MPG.

This would be for a car that has 100% efficiency, meaning, the engine generates NO heat, NO drivetrain loss, the fuel is completely atomized, the car experiences no bumps or hills, etc. With current technology, none of these things are possible. The fact that we can even get 50 MPG in a prius size car is amazing.


RE: All I want...
By FATCamaro on 7/8/2010 2:30:17 PM , Rating: 1
Your math assumes
quote:
Power to cruise at 65 MPH in a mid-size sedan (cruise, !not! accelerate):
~30 HP -> ~22.5 kW

The point is we are trying to drop that number to lets say 15kW. Improbable, maybe? But at least our math is correct.


RE: All I want...
By Spuke on 7/8/2010 7:08:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The point is we are trying to drop that number to lets say 15kW. Improbable, maybe? But at least our math is correct.
If possible, only with super slickery aero and lightweight materials that will cost MUCH more than $20k all by themselves. And more than likely will not make for a passenger friendly vehicle with the possibility of not meeting US safety regulations (super slick shapes generally don't leave much room for packaging).

Anyone have any formulas for figuring out what coefficient of drag and frontal area would be required to only need 15kW to run at 65 mph?


RE: All I want...
By afkrotch on 7/8/2010 8:31:54 PM , Rating: 2
Just get rid of all car panels. Just a bunch of titanium bars, engine, transmission, and 4 seats. That should give us 100 mpg.


RE: All I want...
By tank171 on 7/8/2010 10:49:13 PM , Rating: 2
Pfft.. Titanium. Thats far too heavy. Carbon fiber frame. Also, if all panels are removed, then we would have to make the engine/transmission more aerodynamic, which would be hard. We need some panels. 4 seats? Thats way too unaerodynamic. Try a bed that the passengers lie on. Much less drag that way. The driver would see with a camera and a small oled screen. Also, the passengers are too heavy. Screw having passengers and just make it remote controlled. In fact, screw having an actual car. Lets all drive virtual cars on our computers. We can get incredible speed, handling, aerodynamics, ride comfort, and fuel economy for next to nothing!

Actually, now that I think of it, computers are outdated, unaerodynamic, and heavy. Lets drive our virtual cars on iPads.


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