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Tesla Roadster 2.5  (Source: Tesla Motors)
Extended production sales leads to the electric sports car's makeover

The Tesla Roadster is receiving its fourth major production update with the new Roadster 2.5, a revised version of the electric sports car with a new grille and rear bumper.

The 2011 Tesla Roadster 2.5 received an updated grille that resembles the design of the Model S as well as a new rear bumper with a diffuser element. Other cosmetic changes include more comfortable seats, improved surface finishes and an optional seven inch touchscreen display that includes a backup camera. So far, there are no powertrain changes to the vehicle.

Earlier this year, Tesla planned to stop production of the Roadster and announced in a Form S-1 filing of its preliminary prospectus with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that the company would replace the Roadster with a new model that would be introduced in 2013 at the very soonest. 

But in March of this year, the auto company said they negotiated further with key suppliers and felt they could increase the Roadster's production by 40 percent, extending sales into 2012. Undoubtedly, Tesla's recent success with their initial public offering, which helped the automaker earn over US $226 million from share purchases, has put the company in a better financial place and is helping them stay on track with the 2012 goal. 

Originally, the shares were expected to sell for $14-$16 a piece, but ended up selling for $17. In addition, there was an increase in the number of shares sold. Tesla planned to release 11.1 million shares, but released 13.3 million shares instead, and at a higher cost, which makes this a triumphant success for the auto company. Though, only 17 percent of shares have been sold to the public.

Tesla stocks are now over $21.50 a share, and Tesla is valued at US $1.33 billion. With the IPO's help in bringing Tesla out of a financial crisis, the company's production plan consists of releasing the Roadster 2.5 in 2011 and the Model S in 2012. In addition, the automaker has opened two new Tesla stores in Newport Beach, California and Copenhagen, Denmark. 

No prices on the Roadster 2.5 have been released yet, but the vehicle is available for order and will appear in Tesla stores everywhere "soon."








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RE: Government subsidies
By Dewey115 on 7/4/2010 5:22:26 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Is that because our taxes are low, or because our incomes are so high?

It is based as how much money is left over at the end of the year to spend on whatever we want so I would say thats both. If you look at percentage the numbers are similar, I think around 15th based on percentage.
quote:
No, you suggest a one dimensional metric. The real gauge is looking at WHAT is being done with the money. An example: Here in California, we've been throwing more and more money at our education system, hiring a ridiculous number of non-teaching personnel and giving raises left and right. And over the years, as education sucks up more and more money, dropout rates have gone up. They're absolutely unacceptable. That's how I can tell taxes are too high: They take more money and produce crappier results.

The topic was the amount of taxes so the conversation is "one dimensional" not just what I suggest. The topic of how efficient our government is with that money is a different conversation all together. Thats like saying its "too much" to spend $40k on a vehicle when that is way too broad a statement. I know many trucking companies that would kill to buy vehicles for even twice that amount. The problem of the US government efficiently using the money it is given (or takes) is the problem of the US and its citizens, we are talking globally here not just about the US. I am merely commenting from the POV of being a US citizen, and since the only ones defending this (and blindly at that) are US citizens I have to be on the offensive to counter the unfounded assumptions that seem to be pouring out. I also dont mean to imply everything said by everyone has been wrong, but the majority has been merely assumptions by a US citizen that the US is "the best" and they are searching for "reasons" to make that opinion true. It has to be said that in many ways the US is far from the best because we quite simply are not. Now I would love to be wrong about that, but unfortunately the facts support me here. Maybe overall when everything is weighed we are much closer than just "top 20" but we aren't talking about the country as a whole, merely small parts of it, and in regards to those parts we are far from the best
quote:
As low on the list as possible, and no lower.

Again just proves my original point that we dont want to pay taxes regardless of if the country as a whole will improve if we do.
quote:
Go to the doctor, get her leg fixed, and let the taxpayer foot the bill; as a people we can't stomach the situation you just described, which is why hospitals can't deny treatment.

The hospital cannot deny treatment, but will still sue you for the money. Thats why in this country the number one reason for individuals filing bancruptcy is medical bills and expenses. Thats part of what I meant by in a humane world, I dont consider ruining someones credit as a justified reaction to her having a broken leg. I also found absolutly no mention anywhere of Canada being able to deny emergency treatment. Im not saying that they cant (I dont know enough to say that) but if I found not one mention or instance of it then my reasoning is that it cant really be happening much if at all, maybe some loophole in a law somewhere that never actually comes up? I would love to read a source or two if you have one, I find it interesting that the Canadians would tolerate that AND have the health care system they do. I also dont know many people who go to Canada for treatment, usually just to buy the perscription drugs they need. Most people go overseas if they want the best care at the best price.


RE: Government subsidies
By SPOOFE on 7/4/2010 9:10:17 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It is based as how much money is left over at the end of the year to spend on whatever we want so I would say thats both

So, yes, a one dimensional metric that doesn't accurately portray real life.

quote:
The topic was the amount of taxes so the conversation is "one dimensional" not just what I suggest. The topic of how efficient our government is with that money is a different conversation all together.

Efficiency is at the core; if 1% of your money is taken and wasted, that is too much tax compared to 10% of your money taken and used for things that actually benefit you. Tax is inherently tied to result, and if the results are good, then the tax is worth it.

Yes, it's muddy and subjective territory - what is "good" or "worth it", for instance - but that's how it is. You can't describe the complex interactions of various economic forces with a simple direct comparison of sums.

quote:
I am merely commenting from the POV of being a US citizen, and since the only ones defending this (and blindly at that) are US citizens I have to be on the offensive to counter the unfounded assumptions that seem to be pouring out.

It is unfounded to recognize a high tax for what it is? I don't think you're going on the offensive, bud; it looks like a defensive tone in your posts. I think you're reading too much into others posts.

quote:
I also dont mean to imply everything said by everyone has been wrong, but the majority has been merely assumptions by a US citizen that the US is "the best" and they are searching for "reasons" to make that opinion true.

I don't see that attitude at all. While it is true that any large enough group of people will have the extremely vocal minority of douchebags that won't listen to reason, the vast majority of opinions from that group will be more reasoned. And while there is some vitriol being used in other posts, I don't see this "US is best" attitude that you seem to observe.

quote:
The hospital cannot deny treatment, but will still sue you for the money. Thats why in this country the number one reason for individuals filing bancruptcy is medical bills and expenses.

Yup, sometimes the choices you need to make to save your life or improve your health are difficult ones. I think it's wonderful that those choices exist, as opposed to some government-supplied health care plans that don't allow for some choices.

quote:
Thats part of what I meant by in a humane world, I dont consider ruining someones credit as a justified reaction to her having a broken leg.

And I think that's exactly why credit exists, for awful unavoidable emergencies. Credit isn't a right; it's an abstraction representing a given person or entity's ability to generate and manage revenue. If someone incurs a major expense or gigantic chunk of debt - even if it's because of some crisis that was not their fault at all - it is an absolute reality of their history. You can't pretend it DIDN'T happen.

That's why we have bankruptcy. It is the recognition that shit does happen. It's not comfortable or pretty, nor should it be. If bankruptcy were easy, it would be heavily abused.

quote:
I also found absolutly no mention anywhere of Canada being able to deny emergency treatment.

I don't know why you'd even look, as I certainly didn't specify "emergency treatment".


RE: Government subsidies
By Dewey115 on 7/6/2010 2:28:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Efficiency is at the core; if 1% of your money is taken and wasted, that is too much tax compared to 10% of your money taken and used for things that actually benefit you. Tax is inherently tied to result, and if the results are good, then the tax is worth it.

This is exactly what I said, which was in contrast to the "the lowest possible" comment posted by someone that is not me. I never said to pay as much as possible, and I have stressed efficiency in every post. My argument is not to take all of our money, my argument is (and has been) that it is better to have higher taxes used well to improve the lives of everyone in the country. I totally agree that "good" and "worth it" are subjective and different for everyone, I never said otherwise.
quote:
It is unfounded to recognize a high tax for what it is? I don't think you're going on the offensive, bud; it looks like a defensive tone in your posts. I think you're reading too much into others posts.

Following the quote above "high" is subjective. The original post leading to this was about how "high" taxes are in other countries when they provide more with that money. The arguement was that it was a waste and that started this whole debate in all its glory. I dont consider my position defensive as I have pretty much steered this debate in its entirety. If I was being defensive I would have made a statement and spend the rest of the posts defending it, this has evolved as I saw fit... seems pretty much an offensive IMO.
quote:
I don't see that attitude at all. While it is true that any large enough group of people will have the extremely vocal minority of douchebags that won't listen to reason, the vast majority of opinions from that group will be more reasoned. And while there is some vitriol being used in other posts, I don't see this "US is best" attitude that you seem to observe.

The majority of comments about the cost and price of healthcare as well as our "abilities" in regard to preserving life and mending injuries was not based on anything factual but instead on the belief that the US is number one just because it is. Not one person anywhere at any time here has offered even one source to show me that the United States of America is rating number 1 in anything related to healthcare (aside from being most expensive.) Read through the posts objectively and you will see it, unless you think spouting opinion as fact is valid. In which case we dont need to continue this as my goal is in no way to change your opinions, you can keep them no matter how much the differ from mine... I just dont like to see people saying something is the truth when it clearly is not.
quote:
Yup, sometimes the choices you need to make to save your life or improve your health are difficult ones. I think it's wonderful that those choices exist, as opposed to some government-supplied health care plans that don't allow for some choices.
There are always choices, my arguement is that health choices should not negatively impact your life. If you need to file for bankruptcy because of a medical accident I feel there is something wrong. Credit is meant to show how responsible or not someone is with their finances. If you need a heart operation that results in $150k in bills, how does that mean that you are irresponsible with money? How does that negatively reflect on your normal ability to pay off a car loan? I dont see how those two should be related in any way at all...
quote:
And I think that's exactly why credit exists, for awful unavoidable emergencies.

So your saying that everyone should buy their house with cash? I'm pretty sure credit was established as a way for people to make large purchases while posing as little risk as possible to the ones lending the money. Now credit cards were originally intended to serve in emergencies, but credit was around long before such a thing as credit cards.
quote:
If bankruptcy were easy, it would be heavily abused.

Bankruptcy is very easy btw... as long as you aren't rich I guess.
quote:
I don't know why you'd even look, as I certainly didn't specify "emergency treatment".

Totally my assumption, if we aren't talking about emergency treatment then why are we talking about it. Are you saying that every doctor or dentist in the US HAS to see everyone who comes in? That just isn't true at all, those rules are for emergency treatment, we are no different in that regard. Why would you even point that out? The whole comment makes no sense unless you were talking about emergency treatment.


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