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New operating system will be for high end handsets only, will scrap third party shells (Motoblur, HTC Sense)

Android 2.2 seemed pretty cool, bringing Flash 10.1, a Davlik JIT compiler for faster apps, and the ability to run apps off a memory card.  But Google's recently unveiled Android 3.0 operating system, codenamed "Gingerbread" may make Android 2.2 "Froyo" look downright pedestrian.

First and foremost, not all Android phones will get Android 3.0 when it launches in Q4 of this year.  Only high end handsets, and potentially tablets, will get the top of the line operating system.  Laggard models (also known as "entry level" smartphones) will still run either Android 2.1/2.2, which will be kept alive by minor updates.

For those who experience Android 3.0, the taste will be sweet.  The minimum spec calls for 1 GHz processors, 512 MB RAM, and a 3.5" display.  Resolutions of 1280x760 will be offered on displays 4" and larger, surpassing the iPhone 4's fancy "Retina Display".  And some phones are rumored to have 2 GHz processors (hopefully they'll come with a hearty battery or employ significant die shrink power savings).

Another drastic change in Android 3.0 is that Google is killing off third-party user interface shells like Motorblur and HTC Sense, by offering a faster, superior alternative.  The new built-in UI is reportedly similar to that seen in the Gallery app in this clip, with fluid animations and a photobook sort of feel to it.

The wealth of information was leaked by Mobile-review.com’s Eldar Murtazin in his Russian language/locale podcast "Digestiv." This podcast has been translated by 
Unwired News.

In the podcast, Murtazin claims that the new OS will air to developers and tinkerers in mid-October 2010.  That will be followed by a November/December series of hardware launches, just in time for the Christmas season.



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RE: .
By Hydrofirex on 6/30/2010 3:22:03 PM , Rating: 4
I completely understand what you are saying, but it is at least relevant. That being said, the author could also have just said 'it would make it the highest density display supported on a Smart Phone' and have acheived the same thing.

I think there should be a push to get away from this defacto all things go back to Apple perspective in technology journalism. It's all over - not just on Daily Tech. There are so many frivilous tech articles on CNN that are headlined and given an Apple spin that don't need it. There must be some liberal elitest agenda in the liberal elitest media to support Apple [/joking].

HfX


RE: .
By theapparition on 6/30/2010 4:28:05 PM , Rating: 2
Was reading a mainstream media article about Hulu today and all they talked about was integration with iPhone and iPad. Stated that Android's marketshare was insignifigant.

Insignifigant? We're they serious or just clueless?


RE: .
By Solandri on 6/30/2010 11:32:48 PM , Rating: 3
The publishing industry has all their eggs in Apple's basket. With Apple and the iPad, they found a hardware manufacturer who agreed to implement and support all the DRM they've been wanting in hardware and an OS before they were willing to bring their print publications into the 21st century. The content industry has a huge stake in making sure the iPad is a success. So yeah, they'll support it over other platforms even if it makes no logical sense.

BTW, the iPhone is about 25% of the smartphone market in the U.S., about 15% of the global smartphone market. RIM (Blackberries) is slightly ahead (19%), Nokia is far ahead (44%), Android quickly catching up (10%).


"What would I do? I'd shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders." -- Michael Dell, after being asked what to do with Apple Computer in 1997














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