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Sony Vaio F

Sony Vaio laptops are HOT... hot enough to burn you and warp. Sony believes it can fix that problem with a simple BIOS update.
Sony to recall over 500,000 notebooks worldwide

Apple is one company that's known for its slick tightly packaged hardware.  Another company that can stake a claim to that niche is Sony.  Perhaps coincidentally both companies have suffered from some serious overheating issues in recent years.

We reportedly that the recent refresh to the MacBook Pro lineup spiked temperatures up over 100 degrees Celsius.  Now rival Sony's F- and C-Series Vaio laptops are experiencing a "temperature-control defect", which is causing some of its laptops to get hot enough to "cause skin burns."

Alarmingly, the heat is reportedly so extreme that it can actually warp the shape of the laptop, according to Sony.

Sony is recalling 535,000 units sold since January 2010.  That recall breaks down to 259,000 laptops in the U.S., 103,000 in Europe, 120,000 in Asia and 52,000 in Japan.  Sony, based out of Japan says that within Japan it hasn't had any overheating reports, but has received 39 complaints within the U.S. and elsewhere.

The company has set up a page to tell you if you're affected based on your serial number found on your barcode.  If it is, you can participate in the recall by downloading a firmware update from Sony.  It's unclear whether this BIOS update merely clocks down and/or undervolts the processor, or how exactly it accomplishes its cooler operations.

If your Sony Vaio laptop has been damaged by overheating, you should contact Sony for a replacement.

The bad news comes amid a happy fiscal year for Sony which sees the company finally looking to return to profitability.  The company's gaming and TV business units have struggled over the past couple years, but are finally picking up.



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Misread
By brshoemak on 6/30/2010 1:45:45 PM , Rating: 2
I misread that title and was thinking, how hot does it get that it can actually warp skin? What does that even mean?

Am I stupid or what? (yes or no is an appropriate answer, either fits)




RE: Misread
By misuspita on 6/30/2010 2:09:40 PM , Rating: 1
It warps the plastic it's made of, it burns the skin. Notice the (,)


RE: Misread
By hughlle on 6/30/2010 2:13:09 PM , Rating: 2
even with the comma it is not clear.

iot should state something along the lines of "hot enough to warp, and also to burn skin"

or such, but even then it should be stated that it warps plastic. just a poorly worded title.

but yes, warp skin, that would be silly haha


RE: Misread
By torpor on 7/1/2010 10:32:07 AM , Rating: 2
The subject of the sentence is "laptops".
The object of the sentence is "skin".
Therefore, the verbs "warp" and "burn" refer to the object, which is "skin".
The comma seperates elements in a list; it does not establish a subordinate clause.

You damn kids need to learn how to diagram a sentence.

Now get off my lawn.


RE: Misread
By leexgx on 6/30/2010 2:34:48 PM , Rating: 2
seems clear to me


RE: Misread
By VenomSymbiote on 6/30/2010 4:00:01 PM , Rating: 2
My thoughts were more along the line of "that couldn't POSSIBLY be what he meant, but just in case I'm wrong, I'll check..."

I think the confusion sets in because headlines usually use a comma to replace the word "and".


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