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Print 16 comment(s) - last by omnicronx.. on Jul 27 at 11:34 AM


The Galaxy S lineup will be upgraded to Android 2.2 with Flash 10.1 support.  (Source: Samsung)
All major U.S. carriers will get Galaxy S variant, Froyo

After bungling the Behold II's Android update with a will-they-won't-they approach, Samsung is attempting to cast aside any doubts that its upcoming line of Galaxy S phones will suffer the same fate.

Samsung announced the welcoming news last night via a Twitter post:

Galaxy S phones will come with Android 2.1 and be upgradeable to Android 2.2 which will support Adobe Flash 10.1

The announcement comes fresh off the heels of another Galaxy S development. Though we've recently covered T-Mobile's Galaxy S variant, the Vibrant, as well as AT&T's Captivate, according to CNET, the super AMOLED smartphone will be available in some form or another on all the major U.S. carriers.

While we've also covered Sprint's Galaxy S Pro, the only full QWERTY device in the initial Galaxy lineup has been dubbed "Epic". In addition to its spec sheet, the device will come with a video store to download movies and TV shows, though it is unclear at this time who will provide the content.

Verizon -- not to be left in the other carriers' warp trail -- will entice consumers with the Fascinate, which sounds to be almost identical to the Vibrant and Captivate. Two things stand out about the Fascinate that have not been revealed on the other variants, though: support for numerous video codecs, including DivX, and DLNA support, which allows wireless sharing between other DLNA-supported devices like HDTVs and gaming consoles.

The fifth-largest mobile provider (and most often-overlooked), U.S. Cellular will be receiving a version of the Galaxy S as well.

Availability and pricing of Verizon, Sprint, and U.S. Cellular's handsets has not been announced.

And while Froyo will be coming to the Galaxy S handsets at one point or another, MyDroidWorldhas leaked an official test build for Motorola DROID users that includes root access and a customized kernel.



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RE: Useful cheat sheet
By quiksilvr on 6/30/2010 10:32:17 AM , Rating: 2
It is pretty cool, but there are a couple of errors that need to be addressed:

1) Apple is running on an 800 MHz processor, not 1 GHz:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/3794/the-iphone-4-re...

2) Sprint's plan also should specify that it gets unlimited calls to any mobile phone.

3) Why is the iPad on this chart? Also it should state the memory is internal.

Other than that, it's a nice chart.


RE: Useful cheat sheet
By Aloonatic on 6/30/2010 11:05:11 AM , Rating: 2
I was just wondering how accurate that is too.

Something that leaped out to me was the 720p @ 30fps front facing camera on the Evo 4G, with 720p @ 25fpd on the main 8MP camera, is that true?

Also, how accurate is the wireless b/g/n row?

I assume that the Desire is essentially the same as the Nexus 1?

It's amazing how quickly the Android world is changing though. It only seems like yesterday when the Nexus 1 was leading the way.


RE: Useful cheat sheet
By theapparition on 6/30/2010 12:07:56 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah there's a lot of errors and factually correct but misleading information.

The Droid X will use the OMAP 3640 (not 3630). Also, the PowerVR SGX530 is listed at 14mil triangles/s, while the Adreno in Snapdragon is at 22mil triangles/s. I have no idea if that's true or not on paper, but in real world tests the PowerVR absolutley crushes the Adreno. No contest on the GPU performance.

Also in Quadrant benchmarks, the Droid X running Android 2.1 has been shown to be overall quite faster than the Galaxy S (also running 2.1).


RE: Useful cheat sheet
By omnicronx on 7/27/2010 11:34:58 AM , Rating: 2
Well if you want to be technical, the iPhone 4 surely is rated at 1GHZ (all indications seem to show its exactly the same 1ghz A4 chip being used in the iPad), what speed Apple has it running at is anyones guess.(every iPhone model so far has been underclocked)

That being said, Anands article is anything but fact, hes making assumptions based on iPad benchmark comparisons. That being said, there are various reasons that a mobile variant could receive worse marks in tests like these.

For all we know Apple could be pulling a page out of Palm's playbook and perhaps clocks back to 1ghz during CPU intensive situations such as games. The tests Anand was doing would not be able to show this.


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