backtop


Print 29 comment(s) - last by rika13.. on Jun 7 at 9:12 AM


  (Source: www.productreviews.net)
They may consider games like Nintendo Wii and Dance Dance Revolution for physical training purposes

The Navy has frequently been seen in the headlines  for advancements made from using hardware technology to get its aircraft and fighting vehicles into shape; it may now turn to software technology to get its newest recruits in motion and out onto the playing field.

Navy officials are weighing in on using interactive video games like the Nintendo Wii and
Dance Dance Revolution to help new enlistees build up endurance and get past boot camp.   There is a growing concern that those who are currently enlisting require more work to get into shape than was needed with past recruits.  Officials are attributing it to a more sedentary lifestyle.

Recent studies indicate that the Wii has little effect on family fitness, but that has not stopped the Navy from heavily considering the possibility of using interactive games in the training of its recruits.   According to the
Navy Times, Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Adam Robinson believes that most young people prefer computers and video games to sports and other physical activities.  Using interactive video games, in conjunction with traditional training could help new recruits when it comes to endurance, Robinson said.

"There are lots of programs now that people can [use to] become very physically active while they’re using interactive computer games," said Robinson. "So, in other words, this isn’t about [starting] with computers and stopping [everything else] — because we’re not going to do that. This is about incorporating those types of activities into something that people can use to become more physically active."

Robinson added  that there has been an issue in terms of physical fitness.  More new recruits are injured in basic training because they are not used to the amount of standing and running that is required and they have found that women in boot camp suffer more bone injuries than in the past, Robinson said.

"There have been more fractures and femur fractures and long-bone fractures in some of our young female recruits, and that’s related to the amount of activity and a sedentary lifestyle that they’ve had before they’ve entered the service and then the uptick in physical activity after they’re in the service."

The plan is still in the early stages and there is no timeline set for video game use in basic training.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Could it be?
By The0ne on 5/28/2010 11:19:44 AM , Rating: 2
I don't mind the idea of helping the recruits out but seriously if one is considering service one has to maintain his/her shape and health.

But yes, I agree as well. My nephews and nieces practically have no exercise whatsoever. I blame this on themselves, since most are older now and should know better, and other factors. Growing up, I lead my gang up and down San Diego walking and biking for miles and miles for almost the whole freaking day. Sure, I play games back then. But when I see kids today doing it I just shake my head. 0 activity done. Pathetic.


“And I don't know why [Apple is] acting like it’s superior. I don't even get it. What are they trying to say?” -- Bill Gates on the Mac ads














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki