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Sony Rollable OLED Display  (Source: Sony)
New screen is easier to build than previous flexible OLED screens

Sony has long been working on a new generation of displays that are flexible enough to be bent and shaped around an object. The first of these flexible OLED displays to be seen from Sony surfaced in 2007. The display offered 16.7 million colors and was 0.3mm thick with a resolution of 160 x 120 and a 1,000:1 contrast ratio.

Sony has now announced a new breakthrough in flexible OLED displays that puts the 2007 unveiling to shame. The new screen that Sony has debuted is only 80nm thick and can be rolled around a pencil while displaying images on screen. The screen measures 4.1-inches and is a full color display. To create such a thin display, Sony used a new organic semiconductor material it developed called peri-Xanthenoxanthene (PXX).

PXX is important to the breakthrough because it is stable when exposed to oxygen, moisture, light, and heat. It also has an improved current modulation of eight-times compared to conventional organic semiconductor material pentacene. The new display is also the first flexible organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) that uses an integrated flexible gate-driver circuit.

The integrated flexible gate-drive is key because it allowed the removal of the ridged driver IC chips used in other displays. The design process also uses new organic insulators that can be formed in the atmosphere requiring fewer steps to produce making the construction process less time consuming and more efficient compared to traditional vacuum semiconductor processes.

Sony claims that the flexible display can be repeatedly rolled up to a radius of 4mm and stretched as many as 1,000 times without degradation in the ability to show moving images. The display can show over 16.7 million colors, has a contrast ratio of around 1,000:1, and a peak luminance of 100 cd/m2.



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RE: Cool, But...
By theArchMichael on 5/26/2010 4:07:37 PM , Rating: 0
quote:
maps for the military that can recieve OTA transmissions updfating current evac zones/hot zones and safe areas, base locations, objective and directions, or simply a mobile display unit for diagramming out an attack strategy on the fly, or getting the information from HQ about how the op goes
...
alternately, Wal-Mart sells imaginations i think, you could buy one :)


Yeah!
And if that doesn't work we can roll them up tight and try to stab our enemies in the eye... War stuff is all you can think of? I wouldn't berate anyone else's creativity if my imagination was as limited as yours.

You could probably do so many cool things with this (depending on voltage requirements of course).
-> Cell phone shaped like a pen that you could "roll up" (mentioned by someone a long while back)
-> low voltage alternative to embedded lighting appliances that direct people or show information in low lighting conditions.
-> ultra mobile ebook readers and document viewer

The article says its a "film" so that implies that it may be translucent to some degree. If enough you could do:
-> "dynamic" wallpaper . you could do your office interior windows, cubicle walls, or apartment, etc. then change the color, pattern, whatever at your leisure. (also depends on the maximum distance from edge thing, maybe in strips?)
-> "privacy windows" - like the ones the big bosses have that darken with a switch to become opaque.
-> Heads up display or glasses or something that when used in conjunction with a small attached processing and storage computer unit may be able to provide:
- text to hearing impaired with speech recognition
- information for sporting enthusiasts like GPS, weather, time, heartrate info
... in an over the eye heads up display kind of thing.

If it is almost truly transparent you may be able to layer it in such a way, to give models and like top down images created / taken in 3-d. That will show the viewer an image with 'actual' depth rather than 'perceived', meaning if you looked at it from a different angle it would appear different. Kinda like a hologram.


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer

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