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The FCC is rolling out more regulation -- this time of the internet.
The FCC bids for greater regulatory authority, even as it tries to convince telecoms to embrace spectrum auction

National broadband was one of the key campaign promises that President Barack Obama made in 2008.  His Federal Communication Commission chief, Chairman Julius Genachowski, has tried to deliver on that promise, but has a difficult path ahead.

The FCC's plan to is to take spectrum from television, re-auction it to wireless companies, and use part of the proceeds to finance new lines for the broadband project.  The bid is complicated by the FCC's regulatory war with the same telecoms it hopes to sell spectrum too.

Last month, the FCC lost the first round in its battle with Comcast over internet throttling.  The FCC is trying to stop Comcast from blindly throttling certain kinds of traffic like peer-to-peer connections, commonly used for sharing music and other media.  A U.S. Federal Court ruled that the FCC did not have the power to stop Comcast from doing so.

Now the FCC has reclassified broadband internet from an information service to a telecommunications service, a move that should grant it greater regulatory authority.  The FCC promises it will not abuse the greater regulatory authority its seizing.  The FCC's top attorney, Austin Schlick, comments, "We have never gone back on forbearance.  We have a very strong track record."

Chairman Genachowski, who promised to apply regulation with a "light-touch", added that the approach was only an "interim" step and that he would prefer Congress to officially clarify the regulatory situation.

Verizon Communications Inc executive vice president Tom Tauke says that the plan to step up regulation 
will hurt the national broadband project.  He writes, "The regulatory and judicial proceedings that will ensue can only bring confusion and delay."

Republican FCC members Robert McDowell and Meredith Attwell Baker were also critical of the effort.  They write in a joint statement, "This proposal is disappointing and deeply concerns us.  It is neither a light-touch approach, nor a third way."

Bernstein Research analyst Craig Moffett, concurs, opining that the regulatory bump may not survive legal scrutiny.  He states, "It is extremely unclear whether reclassification will survive judicial review."

Meanwhile, the FCC is left trying to figure out to push both its regulatory and national broadband efforts, a dangerous dance that ultimately brings the future of both efforts into question.



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RE: Good for them
By AEvangel on 5/10/2010 3:09:46 PM , Rating: 3
Winner Winner Chicken Dinner....

The idea that the Govt is better at regulating a free market system then business and the consumer is a retarded at best. The last 100 years of boom and bust economy should be evidence of that. An if you don't think they wont monitor or spy on what your reading or writing on the internet all you have to do is look at Bush and his illegal wire taps on phone calls. Which Congress then came back and gave immunity to prosecution for all the Telecoms who participated in it.

Twenty-five years ago the thought of this happening would have been unthinkable, but no it's accepted with out a whimper from the public. All in the name of National Security.


RE: Good for them
By icanhascpu on 5/10/2010 10:58:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The idea that the Govt is better at regulating a free market system then business and the consumer is a retarded at best.


<_<

Yeah, we all see how well that went with the internet industry here in the stats. Sometimes you go with the lesser evil.


RE: Good for them
By AEvangel on 5/11/2010 12:58:33 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Sometimes you go with the lesser evil.


So basically your still willing to choose evil.

How about you let the free market and the consumer decide. If you don't like how Comcast is doing business then you buy your access from someone else. Other companies will be created if the main players in the industry are not providing a good service at a reasonable price.

Also keep in mind the main reason we have so few ISPs right now is Govt interference in the industry. Once again another sign at how Govt interference supposedly for are benefit has resulted in more problems. The only GOOD solution is getting Govt out of the business all together and let companies and consumers via the free market principles make the decisions.


RE: Good for them
By Starcub on 5/11/2010 12:21:07 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Winner Winner Chicken Dinner....

The idea that the Govt is better at regulating a free market system then business and the consumer is a retarded at best. The last 100 years of boom and bust economy should be evidence of that.

Are you vying for the leftovers? The economic crisis we are in now is the result of a failure of leadership. The problem is that the regulators were restrained from doing their jobs. You're advocating a return the times of snake oil salesmen. What we need is good governement, not no government.


RE: Good for them
By AEvangel on 5/11/2010 12:53:33 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Are you vying for the leftovers? The economic crisis we are in now is the result of a failure of leadership. The problem is that the regulators were restrained from doing their jobs. You're advocating a return the times of snake oil salesmen. What we need is good governement, not no government.


This is the standard comment from someone that has no real concept of what caused this economic downturn. The problem is that Govt is bailing out all the corporations that created this mess with the assistance of the Federal Reserve keeping interest rates way too low for the last almost 10 years. If the Govt just told all those banks sorry your on your own then this would send a clear message to other corporations that taking risks like they did would not be tolerated, but by bailing them out like they have their is no risk for them if they Govt will always support them.

But really the true criminal in all of this is the Federal Reserve. I suggest you do more research on the subject before you embarrass your self any more comments like these.


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