backtop


Print 46 comment(s) - last by texbrazos.. on May 11 at 1:20 PM


Toyota Fine-S Concept hydrogen fuel cell vehicle

Toyota Highlander-based fuel cell vehicle
Toyota expects the market to be small, but avaialble

Toyota is moving forward despite the bad press and recalls and is looking to the future where it may be the first company to offer a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle that is “affordable”. Toyota is targeting a price of $50,000 for its first retail hydrogen fuel vehicle. Bloomberg reports that the $50,000 figure reflects a 90% reduction in cost for hydrogen fuel cell technology since the mid-2000s.

The first hydrogen powered vehicle would be a sedan with a range equal to that of a gas-powered car. Toyota's Yashihiko Masuda, managing director for advanced automobiles said, "[The hydrogen vehicle would compare to gasoline vehicles] with some added cost."

Masuda said, "Our target is, we don’t lose money with introduction of the vehicle. Production cost should be covered within the price of the vehicle."

Toyota won't talk about how many of the vehicles it expects to sell. Masuda told
Bloomberg that the market would be small, but would have some support. The support would likely be mostly from local and state governments.

The biggest issue facing the adoption of hydrogen-powered vehicles isn’t the cost of buying the vehicles. The big issue is the fact that there is little to no infrastructure to speak of across the country. Most hydrogen fuel station are located in California, and even within California, there are but a handful. Hydrogen also currently costs much more than gasoline.

One of the cost cutting methods that Toyota used to help bring down the price of hydrogen vehicles was to use less platinum on the fuel cell construction. The automaker will reduce the platinum used in fuel cells from about 1.06 ounces per vehicle to the area of 10 grams per vehicle. The price for platinum now is about $1,675 per ounce.

Toyota isn't the only company looking at hydrogen vehicles, GM already has hydrogen powered vehicles in use that are leased to retail customers in the Los Angeles area.

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said, "Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, and we can have it forever. We need to wake up the federal government."

Before GM starts retail sales in California, the automaker wants at least 40 hydrogen fuel stations in the Southern California area -- currently there are ten. GM believes that 40 stations could support 15 million drivers in the region.

 



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Amazing!
By Mojo the Monkey on 5/7/2010 2:29:23 PM , Rating: 2
Forget the revolutionary fuel technology, they put glowing blue wheels on the sucker!!! [sarcasm]

Seriously though, why do they bother putting such outrageous neon-glowing-wheel styling on concept cars? All it does is solidify the usual expectation about the concept; that it will never be built and/or will never look like anything close to the concept. Its like writing "SILLY CAR" across the roof.




RE: Amazing!
By Keeir on 5/7/2010 3:05:11 PM , Rating: 2
I think you answered you own question.

How much grief would it have saved GM if the original Volt concept was clearly unproducable, rather than slightly unproducable?

Lets face it, the First Mass Market FCV is likely to be as boring (or even more boring) than the Honda Clarity...


RE: Amazing!
By Mojo the Monkey on 5/7/2010 3:31:03 PM , Rating: 2
But then why present the features in an outrageous exterior design at all? These cars are intended to stir emotion/imagination/excitement, which then inevitably leads to repeated disappointment in the final product.

I'm all for creative new design... I just dont get the silly extras and the repeated use of space aged 25" titanium rims with 1cm of rubber and 1.5 cm of wheel well clearance.


RE: Amazing!
By Keeir on 5/7/2010 8:02:25 PM , Rating: 2
A system can have multiple equalibrium points. Concept cars allow a company to start thier design processes from different point... and thus allow for a potentially different end design.

Its true, most "far out" concepts are clearly not producable nor really make significant movement in car design...

For example the "lighted wheels". For a "normal" car, this would be an obviously silly addition. The question is "Why add lights and redesign wheels?" If the idea is there to start with the question becomes "Why remove lights and redesign wheels?"

Its all part of the evoluation of product ideas. The ability to built product ideas to full scale models and get market feedback... priceless.


"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere." -- Isaac Asimov














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki