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Print 57 comment(s) - last by robinthakur.. on May 6 at 10:35 AM


"Man I love HTML5, but that Flash really gives me a headache!" "Me too, Steve, oh my gosh!!"  (Source: Coder Log)
Microsoft also supports use of proprietary video codec -- h.264

Proponents of HTML5, a hot new web standard that adds video and audio capabilities to the HTML stable, say that it is essential to free the web from the proprietary clutches of Adobe, maker of Flash.  Critics says that it's just a pretty box for another proprietary offering.  They point out that while HTML5 as an open standard could support open video standards like Ogg Theora, all the industry' major players have embraced h.264 -- a proprietary video codec -- as the future of HTML5, essentially killing the hopes of widespread support or adoption of an open codec.

Apple is a big fan of h.264 and a big fan of HTML5.  It doesn't think much of Adobe, though.

Perhaps a more important question, though, is where does Microsoft, who holds more than 90 percent of the operating system market, stand on this issue?   

Interestingly, in a blog to web developers, Microsoft's General Manager for Internet Explorer, Dean Hachamovitch agrees with Apple's assessment.  He states that HTML5 is the "future of the web".  He then proceeds to toss dirt at Adobe, commenting that their "reliability, security, and performance" haven't been so great.

He then softens the blow a bit, remarking that Flash is important to "a good consumer experience on today's web" -- but only because there's not many alternatives widely available currently (most users use Internet Explorer, which doesn't currently support HTML5).

Interestingly, in the talk the Microsoft exec totally ignores Microsoft's own proprietary plug-in Silverlight that it's long been trying to peddle.

Microsoft and Apple agreeing on HTML5?  Microsoft following "Apple's line" with the Windows Phone 7 smart phone operating system?  Windows 7 being fully supported on Boot Camp?  You'd think that Microsoft and Apple were old buddies, not bitter rivals.  What's the world coming to?



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By robinthakur on 5/6/2010 10:35:09 AM , Rating: 2
Well I do actually know what you're talking about as I'm a Flash developer also, but would anybody use Flash if you had to create and animate everything using ONLY Actionscript without the WYSIWHG 'pro' tools?

Its certainly possible, which is not to say that people want to do it. The same is true of Dreamweaver, its an application which abstracts the need to know CSS/HTML/Databases etc. but it still uses the underlying technologies.

Are you saying that a company like Adobe couldn't make a WYSIWYG app like Flash using the HTML5 and associated technologies on offer? Adobe's future, as I'm sure they are only too aware, lies in making HTML5 as easy to use as possible, or in standing behind Flash and fighting their corner. On desktops and laptops, Flash is ubiquitous as a plug-in. In the mobile space which is growing, it is not nearly as available on most devices, not just Apple ones.

The fact that the iPhone OS devices can't run it at all is a very significant thing to a lot of people. Are they more likely to blame Apple for not allowing Adobe to install Flash on the iPhone OS, or are they more likely to blame the person that designed a Flash dependent website which isn't standards-aware and makes no provision for a case where somebody doesn't have Flash? Its a bit like writing code assuming that everybody has local admin access. Flash is great at what it does but it is not an open-standard at the end of the day, and wishing does not make it so! It doesn't ship with the OS, its a plug-in like quicktime or Xvid etc as far as users are concerned which can be complex to get installed and working for the average imbecile.

If I'm designing a site, and the brief is one that works equally well on mobile devices as it does on the desktop (and most clients are aware of this need these days because so many people own iPhones and derivatives) then bottom line is that I won't expect mobile devices to have Flash and will design accordingly, possibly cutting Flash from the desktop version and using something more standards compliant.

Its still not possible to cut out proprietary stuff for things like video yet (easily) but at least users tend to be more forgiving of sites where certain non-crucial elements might be missing but the main content is navigatable, which is how it should be really. Just because FLash is widely used now does NOT mean that should HTML5 rise to the fore that Flash use will decrease and plateau if nobody wants to use it. As for Silverlight, forgetaboutit MS, this ship has sailed!


"The whole principle [of censorship] is wrong. It's like demanding that grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't have steak." -- Robert Heinlein














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