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Overheating issues are unfortunately nothing new for Apple

Apple has a lust for packaging loads of electronics into tight metal enclosures.  That desire has made it perhaps the hottest gadget-maker on the market, but it also has brought it perennial overheating issues.  From overheating iPods and iPhones to the overheating iPad, heat issues have become an unpleasant fact of life for many Apple product owners.

Last week testing by PC Authority indicated that the new 17" MacBook Pro with an Intel Core i7-620M processor is overheating so badly it could boil water.  During testing, the site ran the benchmark Cinebench.  In OS X the laptop hit a balmy 90° C (39.9° C is approximately 102° F, for the non-SI units inclined), while in Windows 7 (using Boot Camp) the temperature spiked to 101° C, according to the laptop's temperature diode.

Such issues under Boot Camp are not particularly new.  On the Apple support forums, one customer "ADKIM", owner of a mid-2009 Penryn MacBook Pro writes, "I've had Windows 7 Home Premium installed for a little over two weeks now and the temparature (sic) gets so hot that my MBP will actually auto-shutdown.
It gets as high as 195F/90C!"

The latest MacBook Pro does appear to be hitting even greater highs heatwise, though, particularly in OS X. 

Already users have begun to complain on Apple's forums.  Writes one user:
I was playing WoW in Windows 7 in boot camp and the laptop felt hot to the touch to the point that if i were to leave my finger there it would start to burn. The hottest part of the laptop was the top left corner. Thinking it was overheating, I downloaded a GPU & CPU monitoring program. The CPU and GPU were both sitting around 70 deg celcius (sic) and i could hear the fan blowing at max speed. Is this normal operation temps for the new model of macbook pros?

The system I am using is the 15-inch Macbook Pro, the model that just came out. Thanks for the help!
It's unclear what the source of the Apple MBP's heat woes might be.  The good news for MacBook Pro owners is that the Intel Core i7 can operate up to 105° C, as can most of the other hardware onboard, apparently.

As one commenter "eww" remarks in an Apple forum post, "100°C at the processor core is not overheating. It is within the safe operating temperature range for all current MBPs."

Technically, he's right about it being within the operating temperature.  But the bad news for MacBook Pro buyers is that even if the case doesn't get quite that hot, it may be hot enough to cause discomfort and even possibly injury (burns or blistering) to the user, if their skin comes in contact with the fully heated case.  Also, such a high heat load raises the risk of hardware failure over the life of the device.

Apple has not yet commented officially on these developments.


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RE: Tony Swash
By retrospooty on 4/28/2010 6:41:10 PM , Rating: 5
ooh ooh, let me try.

1. Be used in an enterprise/corporate environment
2. 3d games
3. Be file compatible with the rest of the world
4. Operate the factories that produce macs.

How am I doing?


RE: Tony Swash
By Pirks on 4/29/2010 10:02:52 AM , Rating: 2
1, 2, and 3 - Macs can run 3D, business apps and play Windows media, mkv and such. So fail here.

4 - you don't have proof that factories producing Macs run on Windows, so I'm not sure what to say here... maybe come back when you have proof?


RE: Tony Swash
By retrospooty on 4/30/2010 8:24:22 AM , Rating: 2
uh... Sorry, you are totally wrong on all counts.

1. Almost zero enterprise apps are written to run on Macs.
2. 3d games - the few that are written perform like crap compared to thier PC counterparts.
3. You cant just name a few file formats that a MAc can read and call it "file compatible"
4. MAc are produced by Foxconn and I beleive maybe on e other contract manufacturer. They all use PC's. The business world survives on PC. Every factory, every purchasing agent, every single person involved runs thier work on PC's. the only thing that runs Mac there, it the test equipment on the production floor and QC and engineering labs. Business runs off PC, live with it.


RE: Tony Swash
By Pirks on 4/30/2010 10:34:54 AM , Rating: 2
so you equate "well" with "well for big businesses" uhm okay :)) I guess that stupid Anoxamore girl who escaped yesterday thinks the same way too. poor souls :)))

your part about crap 3D is funny, got any proof?

nobody cares about few exotic file formats like WMF, hardly can score a Mac deficiency here, may be for you and one other geek on the south pole :) maybe


RE: Tony Swash
By retrospooty on 4/30/2010 10:42:16 AM , Rating: 2
not "Big" business... any business. It all runs on PC. Its not that MAc's arent capable, but that no-one writes software for it. Go see how WELL you can use a Mac in a corporate environment. Obvious by your answers you know very little about business at all.

3d games? On Mac? Proof ? LOL - your too funny. Its not like a unknown fact.

Who is talking about media files at all? You said that, not me. I am talking about ALL file types. Ya, me, one geek at the south pole and the 90% of the computer users on planet earth that all use PC.

As far as Foxconn using PC's to build Mac's that is true too. What procurement software do you think they are using to manage the supply chain and order parts ?do you think its the corporate orer procurement software written to run on a MAc? LOL - it cant be cuz there aint none. what about logistics and reverse logistics? Do you evefn know what they mean? Every product you ever bought that wasnt from a fruit stand or farmers market needs it. Its not obscure the entire world we all know runs off it.


RE: Tony Swash
By Pirks on 4/30/2010 5:14:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
no-one writes software for it
MS writes software for it. Enough with your lies.
quote:
Its not like a unknown fact
It's rather like your personal belief.
quote:
90% of the computer users on planet earth that all use PC
90% don't use exotic file types hence your point is moot.
quote:
how WELL you can use a Mac in a corporate environment
Never saw any problems when I was working on a PowerMac G5 integrated into our corporate Exchange network, everything worked just fine. Stop lying.


RE: Tony Swash
By retrospooty on 4/30/2010 6:55:17 PM , Rating: 3
You are such a politician.
quote:
no-one writes software for it
I dont mean that literally. There isnt a whole lot ef enterprise software. I dont think you even know what enterprise software means.

quote:
Its not like a unknown fact
Show me some benchmarks, the few games that run on MAc vs a similar configured PC. Go ahead. I DARE you.

quote:
90% of the computer users on planet earth that all use PC
I am not going to argue that it isnt file compatible. sure there are some, but overall they dont work. Above that, your comment is correct, to most people it doesnt matter, they wouldnt need to be copying alot of stuff other than media files, which are fine. Again - the purpose of this thread was "things that apple doesnt do well" file compatibility is an issue to me. Not to all.
quote:
how WELL you can use a Mac in a corporate environment

Again, I dont feel you have a clue what you are talking about. Logging in to a domain and getting email is NOT enough. There are 10's of thousands of applications written for business that dont work on Mac. Ones that I have seen just off the top of my head. Seibel, SAP, Oracle, connectwise, Point, Datatrac, etc. this list goes on and on and on and on. You take a Mac into most any company and you cant get your work done becasue the apps they use arent avaiilable. Yes, MS office, and standard stuff exixts, I am talking enterprise software, you know, the stuff the business world runs on, they dont write it for Mac.


RE: Tony Swash
By astria on 4/30/2010 9:59:45 AM , Rating: 2
4. - the OEM of MB and MBP are: Quanta, Asus and Foxconn


RE: Tony Swash
By retrospooty on 4/30/2010 10:44:53 AM , Rating: 2
thanks...

And all 3 use PC's torun their entire businesses. From parts planning, to logistics, to procurement, end of life planning, QA, QC, every aspect is all run off PC's. The only things that would run on MAcs are test systems ont he line that require MAcs, and SOME systems in engineering and QC that require it.


RE: Tony Swash
By Shatbot on 4/30/2010 11:48:07 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
4 - you don't have proof that factories producing Macs run on Windows, so I'm not sure what to say here... maybe come back when you have proof?


C'mon, they'd obviously run Windows. Sure they might run on macs.

Thinking about the reality of the situation, - there is NO WAY they'd run Macs in anything but a hypothetical situation.


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