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No Earth-imploding black holes at LHC this decade. Probably.

While (some of) the world watched the Large Hadron Collider power up, fault, power up again and ultimately land its first 7 TeV collisions, others may have gripped their armchairs tightly, waiting for the planet-destroying black hole that some claim the LHC is capable of creating. As one might be inclined to notice, the Earth has made it through the ordeal just fine.

However, whether these doomsday black hole concerns are credible or not, a pair of scientists from Princeton University and the University of British Columbia at Vancouver have been delving into the relativistic physics calculations just to see what might really happen. Matthew Choptuik from UBCV and Frans Pretorius from Princeton have done the grunt work to solve field equations related to soliton collisions at specific energies.

"Our calculation produced results that most were expecting, but no one had done the calculation before. People were just sort of assuming that it would work out. Now that these simulations have been done, some scientists will have a better idea of what to look for in terms of trying to see if black holes are formed in LHC collisions," explained Choptuik.

Based on string theory and its extra dimensions, Choptuik and Pretorious concluded that high-energy collisions at the LHC could indeed form black holes -- but the chances of them destroying the world are pale even in comparison to the chance that they would actually be detected by LHC equipment while they exist.

Of the events, Choptuik says, "Some are already taking this very seriously. However, I don’t think that we are likely to actually see any black holes at the LHC, even if it is possible."

Rather than directly observing such a formation, he explains that to confirm the existence of the fleeting matter-energy magnet, LHC scientists will have to study the debris from the collision rather than the particles that instantaneously exist and then disappear. A typical collision would leave jets of debris while the short-lived black hole would produce a more spherical pattern.

The duo's findings have been published in the journal 
Physical Review Letters, titled "Ultrarelativistic Particle Collisions."



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Oh really?
By ultraomnipitant on 4/8/2010 2:42:57 PM , Rating: 0
Truth is noone knows anything. People here are standing on what they believe and that only leads me to think of how this will stagnate science and its evolution.

We are only working off theorys here not fact and as science has always shown there will be more to understand.Until we can get out and study these things with tools that can interpret whats going on were in the dark.Even theortical calculations are sure to be missing more data than is known.

Here is the issue i see.Noone really knows what is going to happen at the LHC its all an experament with theory.What i fear is that we are playing with fire before we are ready to deal with the consequences.Same thing happened with spitting/fusing atoms the human race isnt equiped to deal with it properly.It was a step forward that we werent ready to take.

Everyone knows not to experiment inside thier home.You do it in a controlled environment.The controlled environment for these types of things should be far away from our planet.The earth is our home but we fill it with waste pump it with chemicals and harvest our own viruses.We arent equipped for progress and the future.Ex the wise thing to do with waste is to blast it into the sun or put it on a uninhabitable planet.Whos gonna pay for that? No we like rednecks do everything around our house and leave the waste to be delt with by someone else when its time to move.Ok on a small scale but with the stuff we are doing now there is no place that cannot be affected here on this planet.We have eventually sealed this planets fate if our actions dont change.That is enevitability.

Murphys law is something everyone should live by.

Also in recent news the lowering the nuclear stock pile.Great good job but its all a humanitarian play to win the worlds admiration in order to direct it at iran.Im sorry im a white boy in the south but if iran wants to seek nuclear whatever they have every right to do so.You cant do something yourself and try to stiffle someone else because your "bigger" than they are.Now you see why the U.S. is percieved as a bully.There is no justification for that.

Sorry for getting off topic trying to proe a point by changing point of view.The LHC is in my eyes a high risk experiment that should be conducted far away but the state of our progress and limited understanding of things puts it here on earth where we are stuck for now.Stuck here with the folly of others with our waste and with progression not halting for little things like saftey or the future.I mean who cares right youll be dead by then.

I think our first concers should have been feeding the world,space travel,natural power,keeping the planet cleanand living together.We havent even found a way to live together yet which is a easy thing.The consequences of that alone could destroy our future and the planet.

LHC has little importance to the human race right now in this point of our mental physical and progressive evolution.The project should have never been funded.Especially with so little understanding of what is going to happen.I dont think that is shouldnt happen i just think its the wrong time.

Its time to take a stand and quit letting people do what they like in your home but also realize that the same rule hast to apply to everyone.

BTW i dont approve of HARP either.





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