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Wi-Fi versions of the iPad will be available this Saturday

For those of you looking for something "magical" in the words of Steve Jobs, Apple will begin selling its much hyped iPad this Saturday in its retail locations starting at 9 AM. Those that pre-ordered the devices early from Apple's website will receive their units by Saturday. Those that waited a while longer to pre-order online will have to wait until April 12 for their iPads to arrive if they don't feel like heading down to one of 221 Apple retail stores or "most Best Buy stores" which will stock the device.

“iPad connects users with their apps and content in a far more intimate and fun way than ever before,” said Jobs. “We can’t wait for users to get their hands and fingers on it this weekend.”

For those that come into Apple stores to purchase an iPad, a "free Personal Setup service" will be made available. Apple Geniuses will help setup your email or download apps to your iPad. Just don't expect the same service from Best Buy without some kind of Geek Squad fee attached.

The only units available this Saturday will be the WiFi-only iPads. IPads which feature 3G connectivity will not be available until later this month. The iPad features a 9.7" screen, 16GB to 64GB of NAND flash storage, a 1GHz Apple A4 ARM processor, Bluetooth 2.1, and 802.11n. Interestingly, those wishing for a camera will have to purchase a $29 iPad Camera Connection Kit.

Wi-Fi-only iPads are priced at $499, $599, and $699 respectively for 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB models.



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RE: Have to admit
By themaster08 on 3/30/2010 4:38:53 AM , Rating: 2
I read the Newsweek article you posted.

I found it to be extremely small-minded and quite ironic actually.

A fairly large bulk of the article focussed on the closed platform. Basically saying that Apple has reinvented ancient ideas that were apparent with early computers, such as closed platforms and vertical monopolies, stating that these were eventually wiped out by their open platform counterparts.

This is where I found most of the irony to be -
quote:
If at some point you want to buy another brand of device—some newer, faster, cooler gadget we can't yet imagine—you won't be able to take your Apple content with you. Apple could also decide to block the applications of rival technology—as happened last year, when the company wouldn't approve Google Voice, a telecommunications application, for the iPhone.

It's a dangerous path, according to Jonathan Zittrain, a professor at Harvard Law School and cofounder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society. "The price is you are giving up the freedom to choose what code you run and what content you see or experience," on a device you own, he says. "The fear is that we could be charmed by platforms that turn out to be not very good for us."

Of course, bacon isn't good for us, either, but it's pretty tempting.

That says a lot. A platform that couldn't be any more locked down. Stifling competition by filtering out their applications from the App Store.

The iPad may not be very good for you, but still, buy one anyway because it's "tempting".

quote:
The main thing to know about the iPad is that right now nobody, not even Steve Jobs himself, really knows how this device will be used.

That just says it all. We don't have any real use for this device. Productivity is non-existent. Buy it 'cause we're Apple and we know what's best.

quote:
The few developers who did get iPads have to keep the devices in secret rooms, chained to a desk. These folks all live in fear of Apple.

Welcome to your fascist closed platform. It's only a matter of time before someone comes along more welcoming to it's developers, more inviting to it's customers, an overall better product and sees the end of Apple's closed platform reign of terror.

Oh, wait, sorry. Android is already here!

While the iPad may or may not be a huge success for Apple, that doesn't make it a useful product. As even the article says, no one really knows what the use of this device is. So why do people buy it? Because people like you exist.


"Vista runs on Atom ... It's just no one uses it". -- Intel CEO Paul Otellini














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