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Revenue in enthusiast market will grow significantly despite lost market share

Computer and hardware manufactures know that consumers willing to spend vast sums of cash can most often be found in the enthusiast and gamer markets. These people will spend hundreds of dollars on the latest video cards and processors in pursuit of every last ounce of performance.

Jon Peddie Research (JPR) has announced new data on the PC gaming hardware market and the worldwide DIY market segments of the computer industry. According to JPR, 46% of the dollars spent in 2009 on gaming-motivated PC hardware was from the enthusiast class. The money was spent on gear like boutique PCs, high-end processors, and SSDs.

JPR is predicting that a shift in the product mix is coming to the PC gaming market. By 2013, the enthusiast class will lose market share to the performance and mainstream classes. However, the money spent in the enthusiast hardware segment will grow significantly from $9.5 billion to almost $12.5 billion in 2013 making the enthusiast class one of the most important for manufacturers.

JPR video game analyst Ted Pollak said, "PC hardware has caught up to most of the software and people are able to play computationally intensive games on Performance level systems. Performance systems now even support high resolution for all but the most demanding simulations and FPS's. The frequency of Direct X updates is also driving some people toward mid-range GPU's. Some gamers are buying Performance GPUs at a higher refresh rate to engage the latest Direct X version, instead of a longer term investment for Enthusiast GPU's."

JPR president Jon Peddie said, "Gamers are ordering, building, and modding their rigs with components that just a few years ago were simply not available with any economy of scale. SSD's, water cooling, gaming mice and keyboards and other components have come to the Performance class and gamers are starting to snap them up. "

The firm also announced that the global market analysis for DIY PC builds covering gamer segments and business segments has predicted robust growth as well. The market will be worth about $10.4 billion in sales annually and much of the sales will be driven by businesses looking to get better performance from their enterprise applications.



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RE: PC gaming is where it's at!
By themaster08 on 3/24/2010 11:45:59 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed.

The PS3's GPU uses Geforce 7800-based architecture. Even now, some low-end PC's have better video cards than that.

The only problem is that with longer console life-cycles, I feel this will hold the advances of PC gaming back. Either that, or developers shift more of their efforts onto PC gaming.


RE: PC gaming is where it's at!
By Pirks on 3/24/2010 12:12:06 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
developers shift more of their efforts onto PC gaming
Why would they if in your own words above "consoles have a larger user base than the PC"? Migrating from larger market into the smaller one doesn't make sense economically.


RE: PC gaming is where it's at!
By themaster08 on 3/24/2010 12:13:44 PM , Rating: 2
I know it doesn't make any sense. I know the latter is unlikely, but it is a possibility to enable them to advance. That's all.


RE: PC gaming is where it's at!
By DanNeely on 3/24/2010 2:59:13 PM , Rating: 2
From what I understand the artists have been creating models/textures at much higher quality levels than gaming systems can support and then downsample them to the levels that the hardware can support. As a result some features in DX11 cards like their much higher maximum vertex level support will become almost "free" to implement. Higher levels of AA are the same way. The potential problem is when even low level PC gaming systems are enough better to look obviously better to joe user in comparison.

The higher vertex levels from the 4xxx/2xx to 5xxx/4xx series cards are the first time in several generations that 'look what we can do now' screenshots have actually triggered a wow reaction for me. Shader performance has reached the point where gains are incremental and generally not immediately obvious some years back.


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