backtop


Print 50 comment(s) - last by MiKandi.. on Mar 3 at 3:44 PM

Apple removes apps deemed too racy

Anyone who uses an iPhone and has perused the most popular apps on the free side of the App Store has likely noticed that many of them most popular apps are adult in nature. For a long time Apple would not allow adult or pornographic apps onto the App Store, but it relaxed that policy over the last several months.

The 
Wall Street Journal reports that Apple has begun enforcing a more strict policy on adult apps than it has previously according to a person familiar with the matter. Apple has reportedly already removed the raciest of the adult oriented apps from the App Store. Two of the apps that have been removed include one that animates parts of women in photos and one for fans of a porn star.

Apple said in a statement, "If we find these apps contain inappropriate material, we remove them and request the developer make any necessary changes in order to be distributed by Apple."

According to Mac Rumors, 4,000 adult-themed apps were removed on Friday alone by Apple. ChilliFresh goes even deeper into the removals claiming that Apple's new restrictions ban “Images of women in bikinis” and that “No apps will be approved that in any way imply sexual content”.

The App Store clean up is thought to be part of housekeeping ahead of the launch of the iPad. Apps for the iPad and iPhone will operate on either platform and are expected to be a big part of the success of the iPad when it launches.

Apple has previously sparked controversy for approving the baby shaker app only to come back and remove it after complaints.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

By HotFoot on 2/22/2010 1:17:20 PM , Rating: 4
I have a different philosophy regarding these types of devices. I see them more as hand-held computers, rather than a phone that also has some nifty gadgets or applications.

I wouldn't buy a computer of any other class - laptop, desktop, whatever - that was somehow restricted to certain areas of the content that's out there (generally speaking, on the internet). If I don't want something on my computer, then it's my personal choice to restrict it. But I'm not a child, and I don't need a company telling me what's morally right or wrong and restricting my actions or access accordingly.

On the other hand, I see that the iPhone an app store aren't really this way. As Apple holds the keys over what goes in the app store or not, they in a way assume some responsibility, even endorsement, of the content. In that view, they have to pay attention to their image and I doubt Apple wants things like "raunchy" attached to their brand.

Yet again why a closed system just doesn't work for me. I want to be a customer buying from a supplier, not a child being told what to do by some corporate parent. I do not accept artificial roadblocks in a product that could do more.

As I'm not an owner of the iPhone or anything Apple myself, I suppose my concern is somewhat limited. On the other hand, given how dominant the iPhone has been in the market, I do hope that the closed system model isn't adopted by all the competition, and I post my views hoping that the competition is watching and sees there is demand for open systems where the manufacturer isn't adding restrictions to what I can or can't do with a product.


"If you mod me down, I will become more insightful than you can possibly imagine." -- Slashdot














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki