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Nissan LEAF
Nissan to be aggressive with LEAF pricing

Nissan is revealing a few more details about the buying process and deliveries for its upcoming LEAF fully-electric vehicle. Nissan announced yesterday that potential customers can begin putting down $100 deposits on the LEAF starting in April -- to be the first to get news about when the exact date in April deposits will be taken, Nissan recommends that you sign up at this website.

In August, Nissan will begin taking firm orders for the LEAF. Finally, in December, deliveries of the first LEAF EVs will take place around the same time in the United States, Japan, and Europe.

For inquiring minds, the battery pack will be included in the purchase price of the LEAF contrary to previous reports and speculation on the subject. Speaking of pricing, a Nissan spokesman claims that the official price of the LEAF -- which will also be announced in April -- will be close to that of a base model Toyota Prius. Toyota's Prius currently retails for just under $23,000 in the United States, so that would be an astonishing feat for the Japanese automaker.

We're more inclined to be believe that the "low 20s" price tag is after a $7,500 federal tax credit which is sure to attract quite a few buyers. However, if the price tag is before the $7,500 credit, Nissan dealerships might have trouble keeping up with demand for the compact hatchback.

"The Nissan LEAF purchase process is effortless, transparent and accessible, offering value with a one-stop-shop approach for everything related to the car, including the assessment, permitting and installation of in-home battery charging units," said Carlos Tavares, Chairman, Nissan Americas. "We want everyone to feel good about having a car that is affordable, fun to drive and good for the environment."

The Nissan LEAF uses a 24kWh lithium-ion battery pack and an 80kW electric motor (107hp). The vehicle has a maximum range of 100 miles and can travel at up to 87 mph which should be fast enough for just about every U.S. market save for Atlanta.

Although not a full-electric vehicle like the LEAF, the Chevrolet Volt will also be vying for a place U.S. customers' garages this year. The Volt will hit the streets in the closing months of 2010 and could be priced in the low $30,000 range after a $7,500 federal tax credit. The Volt has a battery-only range of 40 miles, but can use its gasoline engine/generator to travel an additional 300 miles.



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RE: Bye Bye...
By muIIet on 2/12/2010 11:45:02 AM , Rating: 0
I agree the Volt is a joke. I never liked the hybrid concept it's double the maintenance and cost. Just think about it, no spark plugs, air cleaner, radiator flush, belts timing-alternator...., Transmission flush, oil changes, water pumps, starter, alternator and I could go on and on. You figure out all those cost and that its cheaper per mile to drive and I think you have a winner. If you only buy cars for how they look just over look my post. The people that have the EV-1 way back loved them, even the techs that kept up with the maintenance said there wasn't really anything to do to them but rotate the tires.

my 2 cents.


RE: Bye Bye...
By ArcliteHawaii on 2/14/2010 3:23:36 AM , Rating: 2
You're right about the maintenance, but the Leaf can only ever be a second car/urban runabout for the vast majority of Americans. That's the genius of the Volt: the best of both worlds: electric for the vast majority of driving, but the range and easy of refueling for long trips. I'd hardly call that "a joke".

Unless you live on Oahu, like I do. Then the leaf is the perfect car. YOu can't drive more than 20 miles in any direction here.


RE: Bye Bye...
By Masospaghetti on 2/14/2010 9:41:31 AM , Rating: 4
Volt mitigates some of the double-maintenance problem because it doesn't have a transmission or driveshafts. And how often would you need to change your spark plugs or air cleaner on an engine that doesn't run for more than a couple thousand miles a year? The alternative is to have a primary (gasoline) vehicle and a second EV - which is much more combined maintenance than the Volt alone.


RE: Bye Bye...
By muIIet on 2/14/2010 3:17:17 PM , Rating: 1
Ok I agree but it is double the maintenance but not as bad as a hybrid. If the Volt had 100 mile range on the battery alone like the Leaf then I would think it would be great.

I agree with ArcliteHawaii 100% on it being a second car or just a around town car. I really do think the leaf would be a ton cheaper to operate for in town use.


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