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Hacker website was closed in November 2009

Hacking into a government or business computer system can yield information for hackers that can be sold for significant profit. Hacking attacks around the world have been increasing steadily and many of the attacks are believed to originate inside of China.

The Chinese government maintains that it does not partake in hacking and does not condone the activity within its shores. The highest profile hacking attack in recent memory was the attack on Google and other large companies that allegedly originated in China. In mid-January 2010, Google stated that it was considering leaving the Chinese search market after the attack resulted in the theft of IP. Google cited many ongoing attacks against some of its Gmail accounts owned by activists that speak out against the Chinese government.

Google later said that the attacks on its Chinese office operations might have had assistance from Google employees. The Chinese government and Google have since the attacks been fighting a battle of words with Google threatening to stop censoring its search results and Chinese officials saying they welcomed any company that followed the law.

China has now announced that it has shut down what is believed to be the largest hacker training website in the country.
BBC News reports that the website, called Black Hawk Safety Net, had more than 12,000 paying subscribers and an additional 170,000 that had free accounts. The website allegedly taught hacking techniques and sold malicious software as a download to hackers looking to perpetrate attacks. 

Blogtactic reports that Black Hawk was shut down in November of 2009 and that three of its members were arrested on suspicion of criminal activity. Exactly why the news was just now released is unknown, but it is likely that China is looking to show that it is actively working to reduce attacks that originate inside its country.

Black Hawk isn’t the only website in China that reportedly trains hackers according to testimony given by cyber expert James Mulvenon in 2008 to Congress. Mulvenon believes the Communications Command Academy in Wuhan, China is training hackers as well.





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RE: Needs Justification
By drewidgho5t on 2/9/2010 6:52:46 AM , Rating: 2
These things are tracked by police, corporations, UN, INTERPOL etc.

So NO it is not just because of the "alleged" google hack, IT IS A FACT. You probably could have googled a search query such as "top countries for computer espionage" and got all sorts of reference sources. This act is what is known as a crime. Criminal statistics are actively tracked for trends in an attempt to assist law enforcement agencies and independant or private security firms in pursuing and defending against future acts of crime.

In a court of law, a statement does not require corroborating evidence if the fact is widely regarded as common knowledge. ie. Going on the lake ice in late March is a bad idea. No need to get the meteorologists for proof that the ice is likely to be thin. Also, in certain instances a person's past may be used in a supporting capacity to help prove the likelihood of a crime being committed by that person. Successful prosecution may be achieved based on circumstantial evidence alone if there is a reasonable amount of circumstantial evidence. China has long been known as a source of counterfeit merchandise. So China's long history of illegal procurement of intellectual property is in fact enough "proof" to justify these statements. Perhaps not enough to take the government to international court but certainly enough to continue with the negative view many have of the Chinese government.

One further fact you may not be aware of:
************************************************* ***************
The Chinese government recently went "on the record" as stating that it is not in their countries best interest for economic/ social prosperity to honour patents or intellectual property held by other nations and/or companies of those nations.

Let me iterate the above statement. The Chinese government has stated that they have no interest in upholding laws when there is a financial benefit to be gained by their ignoring the law.

Those are the FACTS. I did not provide supporting documentations of proof but that does not mean that my post nor the individual statements within are not valid. If you choose to decide that there is no validity to my post for no other reason than because I did not provide footnotes and source references that is your prerogative. I will state, however, what a sad choice that is to make. To pass up on knowledge because the source (me) did not provide absolute definitive proof of statements is a sad choice for anyone to make.

SO WHAT IS STOPPING YOU FROM PUTTING IN SOME EFFORT YOURSELF TO CONFIRM THE CREDIBILITY OF WHAT THE OTHER POSTERS HAVE WRITTEN???


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