backtop


Print 19 comment(s) - last by gtr32x.. on Feb 10 at 8:14 PM

Hacker website was closed in November 2009

Hacking into a government or business computer system can yield information for hackers that can be sold for significant profit. Hacking attacks around the world have been increasing steadily and many of the attacks are believed to originate inside of China.

The Chinese government maintains that it does not partake in hacking and does not condone the activity within its shores. The highest profile hacking attack in recent memory was the attack on Google and other large companies that allegedly originated in China. In mid-January 2010, Google stated that it was considering leaving the Chinese search market after the attack resulted in the theft of IP. Google cited many ongoing attacks against some of its Gmail accounts owned by activists that speak out against the Chinese government.

Google later said that the attacks on its Chinese office operations might have had assistance from Google employees. The Chinese government and Google have since the attacks been fighting a battle of words with Google threatening to stop censoring its search results and Chinese officials saying they welcomed any company that followed the law.

China has now announced that it has shut down what is believed to be the largest hacker training website in the country.
BBC News reports that the website, called Black Hawk Safety Net, had more than 12,000 paying subscribers and an additional 170,000 that had free accounts. The website allegedly taught hacking techniques and sold malicious software as a download to hackers looking to perpetrate attacks. 

Blogtactic reports that Black Hawk was shut down in November of 2009 and that three of its members were arrested on suspicion of criminal activity. Exactly why the news was just now released is unknown, but it is likely that China is looking to show that it is actively working to reduce attacks that originate inside its country.

Black Hawk isn’t the only website in China that reportedly trains hackers according to testimony given by cyber expert James Mulvenon in 2008 to Congress. Mulvenon believes the Communications Command Academy in Wuhan, China is training hackers as well.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Something missing
By Uncle on 2/8/2010 2:53:01 PM , Rating: 2
If the government has their hands in everything including censorship of the net. How did this site with this many members not get infiltrated by a paid informant or the rat patrol. Then again we don't know how long it was up and running for. Makes me wonder if their censorship of the net isn't as good as they would like the people to think because it is all controlled by the Thought police(1984).
It would be good to have someone from China explain how VPN or something similar isn't being used.




RE: Something missing
By carage on 2/9/2010 6:33:50 AM , Rating: 2
If you look on Taobao, the Chinese equivalent of eBay, you can find hundreds of VPNs with the cost ranging from 30 to 1000 RMB per month. Service levels varies, a lot of them are unstable, and some of them cooperate with the government by limiting your access to online games only so you can't connect to HTTP.
If someone opts to use one of those non-cooperative VPNs, your ISP could cancel your service at will. The censors aren't stupid, even if they can't see what you see, they could guess there is probably something fishy going on, and in a land that isn't so much into benefit of the doubt and due process, this could happen and did happen.


RE: Something missing
By Uncle on 2/9/2010 2:42:58 PM , Rating: 2
Thanks for the update.


"People Don't Respect Confidentiality in This Industry" -- Sony Computer Entertainment of America President and CEO Jack Tretton














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki