backtop


Print 50 comment(s) - last by inperfectdarkn.. on Jan 21 at 10:50 AM


Acer seized second place in worldwide computer sales in 2009, thanks, in part, to strong sales of its Acer Aspire One netbook.  (Source: Techshout.com)
Taiwanese company says American vendors can't keep up with aggressive pricing

Hewlett Packard, the world's largest computer maker, and Dell, third place in world sales, are powerful players.  However, both -- especially Dell – suffered during the recession.  Meanwhile Taiwanese OEMs ASUSTek and Acer, whose sales were heavily comprised of low-priced netbooks (the Eee PC and Aspire One, respectively), posted impressive growth.

Acer founder Stan Shih, who helped grow his company into Taiwan's top computer-maker, said this differential response is merely a sign of trouble to come for American companies.

He is quoted by Taipei-based Commercial Times as saying, "The trend for low-priced computers will last for the coming years.  But US computer makers just don't know how to put such products on the market... US computer brands may disappear over the next 20 years, just like what happened to US television brands."

Acer's talk may sound like the same kind of tired corporate rhetoric that executives often spout off.  However, one must consider Acer's impressive performance -- in 2009 the company passed Dell to become the world's second largest computer maker, and according to Digitimes, it is projected to in 2011 pass HP to become the world's top computer maker.  That progress has been heavily driven by aggressively priced PCs, especially netbooks.

One odd man out is Apple, Inc.  Apple, a U.S. firm based out of Cupertino, California, traditionally prices its notebooks well above even HP or Dell, let alone the Taiwanese.  However, it continues to grow and gain marketshare, perhaps proving that Acer's prediction of the American computer maker's demise premature.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Highly doubt that will happen...
By masamasa on 1/19/2010 11:05:18 AM , Rating: 2
Highly doubt that will happen unless they improve on quality and customer service. It's the old saying, you get what you pay for and in the case of products from companies like Acer, Asus, and MSI, that couldn't be more true. I can't track how many defectives I've had from those companies because there have been so many. I don't buy from MSI, ASUS or Acer anymore as a result - too much hassle. As an example, I bought an Acer TV and had to go through 3 of them just to find one that didn't have 10+ dead pixels out of the box. MSI, out of the last 10 motherboards, 4 defective, and they weren't even from the same product line.

If they start putting out higher quality products and learn about what the NA market expects in terms of customer service prices are going to go up because the cost of doing business will. You can only reduce your operating costs so much if you're going to match quality of product and service. I doubt the NA market will buy into shoddy products at cheap prices. Everyone has bought questionable products at one time or another and probably has a horror story to go with them.




RE: Highly doubt that will happen...
By Lifted on 1/19/2010 3:14:00 PM , Rating: 2
Their model is focused towards the Asian market, where support is handled differently. Acer will do just fine with the Asia market alone considering almost 1/2 the population of the world is over there. The NA market is around 10% - 15% of that, so it's really of no major concern to them when looking at the big picture.


By chrnochime on 1/19/2010 5:31:47 PM , Rating: 1
Who would you rather buy an X58 board from, then? Last time I checked, The only company that "makes" an x58 motherboard that ISN'T Asian is EVGA, and even then, they weren't flawless either. Go read forums and newegg reviews on how the 141-BL-E757-TR board have memory problem or memory slots DOA.

And about the "You get what you pay for"? I'm sure someone out there's ready and eager to sell you an overpriced POS.


"Intel is investing heavily (think gazillions of dollars and bazillions of engineering man hours) in resources to create an Intel host controllers spec in order to speed time to market of the USB 3.0 technology." -- Intel blogger Nick Knupffer














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki