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Print 35 comment(s) - last by Ryanman.. on Jan 16 at 7:58 PM

ATI can have its cake and eat it too

It has only been four months since the first DirectX 11 video cards hit the market using GPUs from ATI, the graphics division of AMD. The Radeon HD 5800 series using the Cypress core not only featured exceptional performance, but support for the new standard. Video cards using the new chip sold out almost immediately, and ATI's 5800 sales have been constrained by TSMC's production problems until early December. Supply has risen since then and 5800 series Radeons are now readily available.

The company released the performance mainstream Radeon HD 5700 series in October using a new 40nm chip codenamed Juniper. The smaller chip meant that yields were higher and prices were lower, and many gamers upgrading during the holiday shopping season picked up one of those cards.

On the other hand, the Radeon HD 5970 has been sold out since launch. The most powerful video card in the world has been highly sought after since it was launched in November. ATI has told DailyTech that there should be more 5970s hitting the market soon now that there are more Cypress chips available.

The company also launched its DirectX 11 Mobility Radeon lineup yesterday, with a full range of discrete GPU options ranging from the enthusiast to the mainstream. Those GPUs will be mostly paired up with new 32nm Intel Arrandale CPUs.

DailyTech was at an AMD event last night where the company disclosed that it had sold over 2 million DirectX 11 GPUs, forming a pretty large product base for DX11 game developers that is still steadily growing. A specially commissioned Radeon cake was the highlight of the night.

The ATI Radeon HD 5870 also won the CES 2010 Best of Innovations award in the Computer Hardware category.



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Grats !
By Reclaimer77 on 1/9/2010 2:05:11 AM , Rating: 1
Now make the damn thing shorter please ! I'm not buying a new case just to squeeze in a moderate upgrade.




RE: Grats !
By Fox5 on 1/9/2010 4:33:03 AM , Rating: 3
Wow, 2 million high end cards? Makes me think that each gpu generation has a sales base at least as high as a console, now why can't PC games can't sell well?


RE: Grats !
By meepstone on 1/9/2010 7:32:09 AM , Rating: 2
Swashbucklers


RE: Grats !
By invidious on 1/11/2010 3:01:49 PM , Rating: 2
false. PC gaming is in a lul because of developers not consumers. devs see higher profit margins and lower standards over in the concole arena so they all flock there. PC gamers would never pay $70 for a game that will never be patched and can not be modified for after market use.

does piracy detract from PC game sales? sure. but not nearly as much as not putting out games does. most people who pirate are people who wouldn't have bought it anyway.

do you really think people with 10,000 pirated songs on their computer would have paid $10,000 to download all of those songs in a world where piracy didn't exist?


RE: Grats !
By SlyNine on 1/9/2010 6:00:28 PM , Rating: 3
That's exactly what I was thinking, Is this the sign of a turnaround.

I hope so, and if MS and Sony want to make a new console I hope ATI and NVidia and Intel tell them to make their own videocards.

To many console gamers talk crap about PC gaming, and they don't even realize that most innovation they enjoy was done first on PC. In my eyes they take innovation and dumb it down for the masses, that's great but in the process they think they can just kill PC gaming because they don't want to feel "inferior". Problem is ATI and NVidia's main business strategy is computer graphics acceleration.

So again I hope AMD, Nvidia, and Intel give console makers the big middle finger.


RE: Grats !
By aegisofrime on 1/11/2010 11:34:03 AM , Rating: 2
You are basically asking them to forgo the millions of dollars from console makers.

I hate consoles as much as any hardcore PC gamer, but what you want is just unrealistic.


RE: Grats !
By SlyNine on 1/14/2010 5:29:52 AM , Rating: 2
What I am saying is the death of PC gaming could be the death of ATI/NVidia. Or at least the death of their core business.

They need to consider at least not offering them top of the line parts. I know when the 360 came out the 1900XT wasn't top of the line, but it was close enough, if they would only offer them the equivalent of a 1600XT things would have been much better for their core business, I think. But you know I could be wrong.


RE: Grats !
By Sahrin on 1/12/2010 11:46:48 AM , Rating: 2
Well, 2 things.

1) They do (check Valve's simultaneous players stats on Steam) - but there isn't the marketing machinery of a Microsoft, Nintendo or Sony to hawk the platform; Microsoft's support of PC games comes in the form of developer tools (DirectX), not marketing. So even when there are huge sellers on the PC, there's no one to crow about it. Similarly, there is no 'licensing authority' for PC - meaning that it's not even particularly easy to assemble reliable information on sales.
2) Tie-in ratio: Sales of a graphics cards do not necessitate sales of games (as opposed to consoles - which exist to play games). Many PC manufacturers will bundle more powerful graphics cards with more expensive PC's (particularly in hte $1,200+ segment) as a way of boosting margins (look at my checkboxes!).
3) I think you're dramtically overestimating sales success; a GPU generation lasts 12-18 months; AMD launched the 5800's in October, and have faced absolutely no competition in an upgrade starved market (the prior 12 months was abysmal for sales) into the holiday season (where more than half of all sales in a whole year can occur). AMD will be fortunate to sell 10 million discrete 5000 series GPU's.


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