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See-through goldfish  (Source: AFP)
See-through goldfish could be used for research purposes, or make an expensive pet

South Korean scientists may have created a glowing cat, but Japanese researchers have successfully developed a transparent goldfish.

The clear goldfish allows observers to see the tiny fish's beating heart, which allows scientists to observe living creatures and reduces the numbers of dissections.

"You can see a live heart and other organs because the scales and skin have no pigments," said Yukata Tamaru, Mie University associate professor, in a statement to the AFP.  "You don't have to cut it open. You can see a tiny brain above the goldfish's black eyes.  Having a pale colour is a disadvantage for goldfish in an aquarium but it's good to see how organs sit in a body three-dimensionally."

The goldfish could live up to 20 years and can grow up to 10 inches in length.  Researchers can view the fish as it grows from a speck up to a five-pound goldfish later in life.

Japanese researchers from the Institute for Amphibian Biology of Hiroshima University are expected to begin mass producing see-through frogs sometime in 2010, with the estimated price near $110.

Human rights experts around the world have voiced concern regarding the overall lack of other options aside from dissections, which was one of the leading reasons behind similar research.



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By Chemical Chris on 12/31/2009 2:28:20 PM , Rating: 2
No, when he was young he had a buildup of fluid, which was drained (from 6months to 14 years old) by a valve. It is therefore likely that his brain was much more 'normal' when he was 14, and over the years the fluid has once again accumulated; that is, his brain has been shrunk since that point by the expanding fluid sack. This will probably kill him eventually.
Also, when you grow you do not 'fill up' your brain with memories; while the exact mechanism of memory is still not fully understood, we do know that the brain does not 'grow' and/or get 'filled up' with increasing knowledge/skills learned, etc. (I am being a little bit broad with that statement, ie it is not 100%, but for our purposes here it is accurate enough).
But you are correct that his brain will adapt to its changing environment to keep functioning/alive. As evidenced by his brain shrinking *after* the age of 14 until the present. But all is not hunky dory; his IQ is 75, thats almost 2 standard deviations below the average(he is in the bottom 3 or 4%), so he isnt that bright. But alive and no major, game-stopping deficiencies is pretty good. But it does suck for him, and it will kill him if untreated (draining it now may not be possible, or at least would require a very long time).

ChemC


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