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$4,000 laser mouse
Simply a coincidence, or payback from scorned employees?

Maybe it's a coincidence, but Dell's recent round of layoffs seems to have sparked a flurry of price mistakes on Dell.com. According to the Wall Street Journal, Dell has plans to lay off 16 percent of its 4,500 strong workforce in Malaysia -- that means that 700 people will be out of a job by the end of June 2010.

Interestingly enough, around the same time the layoffs were announced, numerous price mistakes started hitting Dell's website. Deals site Slickdeals was the first to notice the steady stream of price mistakes with one of the more popular finds being a 3.2GHz dual-core Xeon 5060 processor for a mere $10.99. Other popular pricing errors included a Xeon E3110 (3GHz) for $16.99, a Xeon E5450 (3GHz) for $39.99, and a Xeon L5430 (2.66GHz) for $12.99.

While extremely low-priced processors were being snapped up by people looking to make a quick flip on eBay -- in the slim chance that the orders actually go through -- there are other price mistakes that aren't such hot deals. A 120GB 7200 RPM SATA hard drive for a Dell Studio 1735 is listed at a whopping $21,000 while a laser mouse is going for a cool $4,000. Another humorous addition is an Inspiron AC adapter for $710.

Dell may be laying off 700 employees, but it seems as though its remaining employees will be working overtime to flag the thousands of orders that have likely been processed for the ultra-cheap Xeons.

Now we can't be sure that the two events are related, but something smells fishy for sure at Dell today.



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I was a Dell Technician
By TheEinstein on 12/18/2009 7:56:33 AM , Rating: 2
Please do not shoot me til you read the story!

I was a technician via a contracting company for the Dimension line. We were also overflow for all other lines as well.

I was a typical computer user when I started, went through the course, became a typical geek user who could fix most things, and by the end of the year I was the tech you wish you could reach on the first call.

It was good work for low tech wages (The place had the nickname Stream U... as in University) but great learning opportunities. They had HP, Dell and many other tech related companies as contracts so you could go around and get the full range of skills while (quietly) getting your degrees via fast track.

But in 2001 they shipped the Dell tech support to India.

For 3 years I was able to get enough customers to barely survive (I am a bad advertiser) based upon one common theme "They never fix anything anymore!"

Customers would call, get told to replace the OS, and then all is fixed. It would be the hard-drive. Or they replaced the Hard-drive three times, and it was the RAM. It was really stupid to hire script monkeys to read the scripts of possible errors. (No racism, just elitism from this post, please I do not accept racism ever!)

I would call up after getting the contract, walk the 'enemy script reader' through his script by telling him the steps one by one before he could say anything, tell him what his script tells him to say, then tell him why it was wrong and what part was really needed.

Invariably they would wonder 'how do you know so much?' and I would say "I wrote the damned script you are reading, and the revision, but the revision was refused by stupid executives" (Of course I never wrote the scripts, but I would write revisions frequently, including some that ended up being hot-fix methods for new issues). Needless to say they always sent the proper part when I said that.

Dell has been dropping downhill since the introduction of Windows Millennium by MSoft. They rushed to make hard-ware in record times and threw it all together with a crap OS to take advantage of hype. They went downhill from then on.




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