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Print 41 comment(s) - last by The0ne.. on Dec 4 at 10:07 AM


  (Source: Psystar)
Psystar is now refocusing its efforts on its unlocking software, but Apple is looking to hand it another defeat

Apple's legal campaign to crush Mac cloner Psystar made headlines several times over the last year and provoked diverse responses.  Some were supportive of Apple, arguing that the company had every right to tightly enforce the strict provisions on its operating system.  Others argued that Apple was being abusive and manipulating its position to sell overpriced hardware.

In the end Psystar was handed a defeat in a summary judgment.  Earlier this week it announced that it was partially settling with Apple.  Now details of that settlement have been finalized.

Psystar, which already went bankrupt once, has agreed to pay Apple $2.647M USD in damages for marring its "brand image" by releasing Mac clones.  It also agreed to suspend production and sales of all its Mac clones and has since pulled the sales page from the company's website.  The decision casts uncertainty on the status of orders from those who bought Mac clones in the final days before the settlement, individuals whose systems have not yet been shipped.

While the situation seems to be dire for Psystar, the company vows to persist in its campaign of rebellion.  The company is now focused on its unlocking software offering Rebel EFI, which allows OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard) to be installed easily on a variety of hardware configurations with Intel processors.  Rebel EFI provides support for multi-boot systems with a mix of Linux, Windows, and OS X installed.

Apple is trying to kill off Rebel EFI, though.  The company is battling Psystar in a separate case in Florida court.  The Mac clone case took 17 months, so it appears that the final fate of Psystar won't be decided for some time.  The odds seem stacked against the company, though; the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which helped hand Apple a victory in the clone case, specifically outlaws users or businesses to circumvent software protections, even on devices they legally own.  As Psystar is doing exactly that, it seems to be on some pretty weak legal ground, regardless of how "fair" the DMCA is.

Until the hammer drops, though, Psystar plans to continue to sell its software and defy Apple's closed box business model.



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RE: Funny thing about Apple... and boot camp
By Yawgm0th on 12/3/2009 11:11:48 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
Apple is a hardware company, Microsoft is a software company.
FinalCut Pro, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, iWork (Keynote, Pages, Numbers), QuickTime, Aperture, Logic, Shake, Xsan, and so on.

Zune, Xbox, XBox360, Xbox 360 accessories ranging from hard drives to controllers, mice, keyboards.

quote:
What Apple cares about is moving systems, they don't care about software sales.
There is only one thing any logical company cares about: profits. Apple does care about software sales, even of Mac OS X, specifically, since those sales yield revenue and ultimately profit.

Apple believes that Hackintosh users/makers siphon enough money away from its hardware sales that the potentially increased software sales will not make up about it.

Apple is wrong and is litigating itself out of a huge market through which it could drastically increase profits and expand its OS market share.


RE: Funny thing about Apple... and boot camp
By Camikazi on 12/3/2009 11:50:40 AM , Rating: 3
"Apple is wrong and is litigating itself out of a huge market through which it could drastically increase profits and expand its OS market share."

That last part, expand it's OS market share is probably why they won't do it. They know how much work it would be to code for and make sure their OS could run on the HUGE amounts of configurations out there.


RE: Funny thing about Apple... and boot camp
By Murloc on 12/3/2009 12:41:14 PM , Rating: 5
it would make mac OS like windows, with the same problems, like drivers.

The myth about "it just works" would completely fall


RE: Funny thing about Apple... and boot camp
By stugatz on 12/3/2009 12:52:04 PM , Rating: 5
Exactly, Apple is neither a hardware company, or a software company, they are a "brand package" company. They design their software to work with a specific set of hardware, and sell you that resulting product at an inflated price, because consumers have come to believe there is extra value in the Apple brand, they know what they are getting, and are willing to pay extra for it and the support they know they can get.

Once Psystar comes in and starts breaking up that model by selling the OS on non Apple hardware, there is no longer that guarantee that things will work as expected, people at a friends house with a Psystar Mac, could see it crash, and tarnish the brand, which is the important thing for Apple to avoid.


By seamonkey79 on 12/4/2009 12:22:39 AM , Rating: 2
bing bing bing we have a winner

or should I say...

bing 2.0 bing 2.0 bing 2.0 we have a winner


By tlmck on 12/3/2009 10:13:47 PM , Rating: 2
They could amend their license to state that if you install OSX on non Apple hardware you will receive no tech support from Apple. In other words, you would be on your own.

The real reason they do not release OSX to the masses is that it would be the final nail in the coffin for Mac hardware. Some would still buy Apple branded computers, but probably not enough to sustain the business.


RE: Funny thing about Apple... and boot camp
By Yawgm0th on 12/3/2009 10:40:18 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
That last part, expand it's OS market share is probably why they won't do it.
I agree partly. They're deathly afraid of losing control of any of their products, especially Mac OS X.

quote:
They know how much work it would be to code for and make sure their OS could run on the HUGE amounts of configurations out there.
I disagree here. There's this myth that Microsoft does all this work to make Windows run on (almost) any x86 computer. Totally untrue. Microsoft's work on Windows relates almost entirely to the OS itself. The vast majority of drivers are coded by hardware manufacturers, as they should be. Security, interface, kernel enhancements, random features, etc. are what Microsoft works on with Windows.

Microsoft has a platform that is open enough that it's an incredible business model. Apple has a platform that is technologically capable of being in the same boat but has been arbitrarily held back. Apple is the #1 blockade to OS X's market share.

In any case, I'm not talking about Apple even supporting third-party Macs. Simply not spending engineering time on making the OS inaccessible to third party hardware alone would be enough to drastically increase software sales.


By The0ne on 12/4/2009 10:07:01 AM , Rating: 3
Yes, but most consumers will blame the OS instead of the 3rd party mfg. And that's where a lot of the problems come from.


By Belard on 12/3/2009 2:11:11 PM , Rating: 2
Microsoft also sells notebook cooling pads, remotes, web cams. To a degree celphones (fail) and network products (fail) such as routers.

Yep, 2-3 years ago, there were Microsoft brand routers at best buy. No nothing... which is why you buy such things from reputable manufactures.


By sprockkets on 12/3/2009 6:00:58 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
FinalCut Pro, Mac OS X, Mac OS X Server, iWork (Keynote, Pages, Numbers), QuickTime, Aperture, Logic, Shake, Xsan, and so on.


Which works on, *wait for it* Macs!

And if you want that, you have to buy, *wait for it*, a Mac!

SOFTWARE SELLS HARDWARE. NEVER FORGET THAT.


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