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Print 34 comment(s) - last by huanglungfa.. on Dec 4 at 1:50 AM

Don't want to be obsolete before launch

Most laptops and netbooks today come with a SDHC flash memory card reader. One of the major benefits of standardization is the ubiquity it allows. Consumers can take a SD or SDHC card from a digital camera or camcorder and transfer the data quickly to a laptop, enabling them to edit and/or email their media files easily.

The new SDXC standard announced earlier this year will begin to replace SDHC in 2010. The new memory cards will be able to support speeds as high as 300MB/s and capacities as large as 2TB. Best of all, the new standard is backwards compatible, meaning that SDXC readers will be able to read SDHC, SD, and MMC memory cards.

In order to prepare for this, laptop manufacturers are looking to replace SDHC readers in their laptops with SDXC readers. DailyTech has received information that Lenovo, HP, and Dell are actively working on laptops with SDXC support, but no information is available yet from Apple or how soon SDXC will make its way into MacBooks.

Intel will soon introduce new Westmere-based 32nm Arrandale mobile CPUs, which will feature integrated graphics on the same package. Laptops using the new chips are expected to be cheaper and use less power, greatly extended battery life. Laptop manufacturers are expecting brisk sales from the new designs, which must last until the Sandy Bridge generation of mobile CPUs is ready in 2011.

The issue is complicated by the fact that many SDHC readers are connected internally through a USB 2.0 bus, which does not have enough bandwidth to support SDXC. Connections for SDXC must be made instead through the PCIe bus.

The first products using SDXC are expected to be shown at the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show in January.



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RE: Wow!
By AnnihilatorX on 11/30/2009 12:54:37 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
support speeds as high as 300MB/s


I suggest re-reading the sentence.
FYI "SATA-II supports 6Gb/s" :P


RE: Wow!
By KingstonU on 11/30/2009 1:08:53 PM , Rating: 2
I thought it was

SATA I = 1.5GB/s
SATA II = 3GB/s
SATA III = 6GB/s

Where actual real world transfer speeds of SATA II hard drives tops out at ~260MB/s.


RE: Wow!
By steven975 on 11/30/2009 1:26:47 PM , Rating: 4
Actually it is 1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 Gbps. Megabits...

Since they use 8b/10b encoding, it is 150, 300, and 600MBps. Megabytes...

SATA300 starts capping out at ~250MB/s in actual throughput versus the 300MB/s theoretical. Pretty fast IMO.


RE: Wow!
By amanojaku on 11/30/2009 1:44:37 PM , Rating: 3
Close, but:

SATA 1.5Gbit/sec = 187.5MB/sec ~ 178.81MiB/sec
SATA 3.0Gbit/sec = 375MB/sec ~ 357.63MiB/sec
SATA 6.0Gbit/sec = 750MB/sec ~715.26MiB/sec

Where:
Gbit = 1,000,000,000 bits = 125,000,000 bytes
MB = 1,000,000 bytes = 8,000,000 bits
MiB = 1,048,576 bytes = 8,388,608 bits

As you said, these are the raw line rates and not the data rates, which are as much as 80% of raw.


RE: Wow!
By ChronoReverse on 11/30/2009 4:04:22 PM , Rating: 2
Except you completely missed this part:
quote:
Since they use 8b/10b encoding, it is 150, 300, and 600MBps. Megabytes...


So 150MB/s, 300MB/s and 600MB/s


RE: Wow!
By Shining Arcanine on 12/3/2009 5:10:14 PM , Rating: 2
Close, but:

1MB = 1,048,576 bytes = 8,388,608 bits

If you want to specify it in powers of ten, then say:

1MiB = 1,000,000 bytes = 8,000,000 bits

MB has been defined for the past several decades as being a power of 2. Using a power of 10 is just an approximation of it, and no standards organization can come along and change that.


RE: Wow!
By AnnihilatorX on 11/30/2009 2:12:53 PM , Rating: 2
I'd be careful with capital B and b. b is bit while B is bytes.
As people kindly pointed out, I was wrong about SATAII, I meant III


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