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“My decision to stop iPhone development has had everything to do with Apple’s policies.” – Joe Hewitt

In the early days of social networking, the dominant player was MySpace. As time went by, MySpace was joined by other players like Facebook and Twitter. MySpace has since lost the top position in the social networking world to Facebook.

In October, traffic numbers for September 2009 for social networking sites came in and Facebook had over 300 million users, pushing MySpace to second place in user numbers. One of the things that Facebook users on the iPhone enjoy and that contributed to the user numbers is the Facebook iPhone app, which is the most popular app on the App Store.

The developer that built the Facebook app for the iPhone has quit development for the iPhone and passed the app off to another engineer at Facebook. TechCrunch reports that Facebook App developer Joe Hewitt is still at Facebook and is simply working on new projects.

Exactly what projects the Hewitt is working on are unknown. As for the reason why the developer stopped developing for the iPhone, the reason is clear. Hewitt said, "My decision to stop iPhone development has had everything to do with Apple’s policies." Hewitt says that he is "philosophically opposed" to the existence of a review process and that he is worried Apple's policy might be implemented by other companies seeking to mimic Apple's App store success.

Apple has been under increasing scrutiny for its practices of approving and disapproving apps that are seemingly haphazardly enforced. Apple has found itself in hot water with the FCC after the FCC asked AT&T and Apple to explain why they rejected Google Voice from the App Store.

One particularly tough question the FCC posed to the AT&T and Apple was, "Do any devices that operate on AT&T’s network allow use of the Google Voice application? Do any devices that operate on AT&T’s network allow use of other applications that have been rejected for the iPhone."

Despite Hewitt's stepping away form iPhone development for Facebook, the social networking giant still has people working on its iPhone application. Perhaps the action by a high profile developer will spur others to speak out about the Apple app approval process.



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RE: Really?
By Spivonious on 11/12/2009 12:53:34 PM , Rating: 2
Apple fanboy alert.


RE: Really?
By AshT on 11/12/2009 1:12:35 PM , Rating: 2
Mmmk. If you mean Apple-product-owner ... then yes. iPhone and a Mac. So I guess that means I'm qualified to talk about them.


RE: Really?
By aapocketz on 11/12/2009 2:56:48 PM , Rating: 2
sounds more like you may be biased, unless you can think of a non-profit motive for not allowing mobile flash client. Its a business, pretty much all their rational decisions have (and should have) profit motive.

Another phone platform like symbian or android may seek to support flash to make the phone more attractive, especially with flash video and games being key. Apple probably wants to restrict this as much as possible to not cannibalize their app business. Apple will probably not change this policy until other platforms start attracting away their customers using this feature to differentiate the market. Money talks.


RE: Really?
By kmmatney on 11/12/2009 11:12:54 PM , Rating: 2
As an iPhone owner, I can speak for many of us when I say - we don't give a rats ass about Flash. I'm not against it, but if there was support, I would hope there would be an option to turn it off. There are a few improvements I would like to see - such as expandable memory, and better multi-tasking (it is there on the iPhone, but limited) but overall it does every business task I need it to do.


RE: Really?
By AshT on 11/13/2009 2:34:40 AM , Rating: 2
Why don't you grow your hair and a beard and smoke da happy herb and dream of a day when a business makes their decisions based on love and peace and not a corporate strategy?


"So, I think the same thing of the music industry. They can't say that they're losing money, you know what I'm saying. They just probably don't have the same surplus that they had." -- Wu-Tang Clan founder RZA














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