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Technology is a great asset for those on metered connections or connecting from mobile devices

Over the weekend Opeara Software announced that close to 3 million users are taking advantage of its new "turbo mode" server-side compression feature, built into Opera 10.  While not the first to offer such a feature, Opera does appear to be the largest current deployment of server-side compression in the consumer browser market (dialup providers also used compression in the past). 

One promising use of Opera's compression technologies is on metered-connections, where less data means less money charged.  Likewise, the compression built in to Opera Mini and Opera Mobile -- browsers built for mobile phones -- also offer similar advantages to users with mobile data plans.

Opera claims in its most recent "State of the Web" report to have 35.6 million Opera Mini users.  These customers have viewed 15 billion pages in September 2009 -- roughly 420 page views monthly per customer on average.  These page views amounted to 227 million MB of data.  As Opera Mini compresses viewed pages by up to 90 percent, this indicates that Opera Mini servers processed close to 2.1 petabytes of data.

The company says that users in its top ten countries -- Russia, Indonesia, India, China, Ukraine, South Africa, United States, United Kingdom, Poland and Vietnam -- save $672M USD monthly and $8.1B annually based on usage charges/the average cost of browsing per MB.

According to Opera, the top handsets in terms of Opera Mini use were:
1) BlackBerry 8330 ("Curve")
2) Samsung SPH-M800 ("Instinct")
3) LG CU920 ("Vu")
4) Samsung SPH-M810 ("Instinct S30")
5) BlackBerry 9530 ("Storm")
6) Nokia 3110c
7) BlackBerry 8310 ("Curve")
8) BlackBerry 9000 ("Bold")
9) BlackBerry 8130 ("Pearl")
10)BlackBerry 8320 ("Curve")
Jon von Tetzchner, CEO, Opera, cheered the progress of Opera Mini.  He states, "We are on a mission to bring the Web to everyone, on their terms.  More than half the world's population has a mobile phone. By making the mobile Web more affordable and available on almost any mobile phone, we help democratize it. This means we can expand the reach of the Web in a way that defies imagination"


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Report: who cares
By Screwballl on 10/28/2009 10:24:08 PM , Rating: 2
We are all tired of useless reports saying "we now have 0.00000001% of the market, up 12% in the past decade"...

Let us know when there is something newsworthy DT, like Opera now being compatible with Firefox plugins or the Wii actually getting a decent Opera upgrade, or something most of us actually care about.




RE: Report: who cares
By invidious on 10/28/2009 11:09:21 PM , Rating: 2
Let us know when you are actually going to read an article instead of responding to the title. The article has nothing to do with market share.


RE: Report: who cares
By Chocobollz on 10/29/2009 3:52:22 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
We are all tired of useless reports saying "we now have 0.00000001% of the market, up 12% in the past decade"...

So what? At least they innovate and makes their products better. And while still being free.

quote:
Let us know when there is something newsworthy DT, like Opera now being compatible with Firefox plugins

Why should it be compatible with FF's plugins? Just to get it overloaded and make it unusable? Not to mention that you have to check for the plugin's compatibility each time a new version come out and if the plugin's author decided to stop developing it anymore, BAM! You're left out in the dark. I'm tired of these plugins nonsense.

quote:
or the Wii actually getting a decent Opera upgrade

Why should it be upgraded when there's nothing to fix? :-/

quote:
or something most of us actually care about.

So what are you really care about? A browser who gets 99% market share but is slower than Opera and overloaded with plugins? Is that what you want? LOL


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