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Turbo Mode is one Opera 10's most popular features. In just a month, 3 million people used the new feature, which is also utilized to speed up Opera's mobile browsers for smart phones.  (Source: Opera)
New feature is popular among users in a variety of scenarios

While Firefox and Internet Explorer earn most of the news and publicity, smaller browsers like Google Chrome and Opera are quietly earning more marketshare.  Norwegian-based Opera recently debuted a new browser, Opera 10, which brought improved speed compatibility, and some innovative built-in features.

Among the most popular of the new browser's features is Opera Turbo.  The feature uses server-side compression to deliver webpages faster on slow connections.  It can compress webpages 3 to 4 times, reducing transfer size by up to 80 percent in some cases.  Turbo is located in the lower left-hand corner of Opera 10 and is turned on with a click.

In the first month after Opera 10's release, Opera reports that almost 3 million users worldwide tried the new feature.  They used it to view 668 million compressed Web pages, numbers that indicate that the feature is gaining significant traction.

Users cited a variety of reasons for using the feature.  Some users, forced to use slower connections like dialup or slower DSL conections, used the Turbo mode to help make navigating these slow lines less of a headache.  Other customers who used mobile internet cards or other metered/pay-as-you-go plans turned on Turbo to reduce their data transfer and lower their monthly bills or prevent overages.

Looking forward, Opera is providing support for AT&T's fall smart phone browser lineup (other than the iPhone).  The new "att.net" features Opera Mini, Opera's popular smart phone browser.  DailyTech recently took Opera Mini 5 for a test drive on the Blackberry Storm, and found the latest version to be vastly improved, and much faster than the native browser.  Opera's mobile browsers use many of the same compression techniques that power its PC Turbo Mode.




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RE: Slow?
By Sunrise089 on 10/25/2009 6:03:05 AM , Rating: 0
Really? Wow! You mean it has built in features that help work around the fact that it's too poorly designed to render webpages properly?

You know what else involves only a few easy steps to viewing webpages? Opening a web browser that actually works. Like Firefox and Internet Explorer. Perhaps that's why these free products command 90+% of the browser market and Opera is a rounding error.


RE: Slow?
By dark matter on 10/25/2009 8:57:06 AM , Rating: 1
Erm Sunrise, you are aware that Opera 10 is the only ACID compliant browser on the market? No doubt you have no idea what I am talking about.

But, thanks for the chuckle I don't usually laugh at the ignorant.


RE: Slow?
By alphadog on 10/25/2009 10:12:37 AM , Rating: 5
I love how some people latch on to useless marketing blurbs to say their browser is bigger than another's.

Firefox is 93/100 compliant. So, I don't have SVG fonts. Whoopedeedoo. At least they focus on relevant features.

Most real websites use frameworks to build sites that degrade gracefully over the multiple browser makes, models and versions that are out there.

Full ACID3 compliance is nice, but the remaining 7 points are just for fanboy bragging rights.


RE: Slow?
By photi on 10/25/2009 9:16:38 AM , Rating: 2
clearly you have never used opera. you should try it out, it is a damn fine browser for web users and web developers alike (developers see Dragonfly on the Opera website). I have used IE, Firefox, Safari, Flock, Konqueror, and Opera. Opera easily takes the cake home. Quite feature rich.


RE: Slow?
By photi on 10/25/2009 9:19:07 AM , Rating: 2
i forgot to mention chrome, i have also used chrome, it is my 2nd favorite after opera


RE: Slow?
By Zoomer on 10/26/2009 5:33:08 PM , Rating: 2
Well, Chrome is just KHTML/Webkit anyway.


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