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Print 63 comment(s) - last by otispunkmeyer.. on Oct 27 at 8:41 AM


Honda has already axed the S2000.

The tiny CR-Z will carry the "sports" torch for Honda and will be priced from $19k to $25k.

Crosstown rival Toyota goes the conventional route with a RWD sports car which was co-developed with Subaru -- it will be in the same price range as the CR-Z. The production version of the FT-86 is expected to be shown next year.

While Honda has killed plans for its V-10 powered NSX replacement, Toyota just pulled the wraps off its ultra-exclusive Lexus LFA.
Honda is really taking "going green" seriously

The company that brought us small, nimble, sporty, FWD vehicles like the CRX, Prelude, Integra, and RSX is slowly giving in to the green movement. While Honda was content in stepping things up to the next level with the expensive, mid-engined, RWD NSX during the early 90s and the lightweight S2000 roadster later in the decade, those days are coming to an end (the NSX is long gone and the S2000 was recently given the axe).

Honda is now turning almost completely away from performance vehicles and instead intends to “green” its lineup. Going forward, the “sport” end of the spectrum for Honda will be relegated to the Civic Si and the upcoming CR-Z hybrid. The CR-Z uses the hybrid powertrain from the Civic Hybrid/Insight and pairs it with a 6-speed manual transmission. The 161-inch vehicle is expected to be priced from $19,000 to $25,000.

While Toyota plans to wow gear heads with money to spend with the $375,000 V-10 powered limited production (500 units worldwide total) Lexus LFA super car and the much cheaper, RWD FT-86 sports car; Honda has cancelled the V-10-powered replacement for the NSX. According to Temple of VTEC, Honda has no plans to introduce another sports car to the market unless it can incorporate hybrid, plug-in hybrid, or hydrogen technology.

Honda CEO Takanobu Ito told Temple of VTEC, “Once we come up with these new, innovative technologies that we are researching - once we have (an) abundance of cash on hand - I would definitely love to see Honda develop a sports car which would symbolize these technologies. And, once that day comes, the sportscar will NOT be something like Toyota announced yesterday, but instead it will be environmentally friendly (while) at the same time enjoying outstanding performance. I'd love to do that."

In other news, Honda has also cancelled plans to bring a diesel engine to the U.S for its Accord sedan due to cost issues. The Accord was to have an optional 2.2-liter i-CTDi 4-cylinder Tier 2 Bin 5 diesel engine which produces 150 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. The diesel engine would have also given the Accord an overall fuel economy rating of about 40 mpg. Also cancelled are plans for a larger 3.5-liter V6 diesel engine which was destined to go into Honda's large vehicles which include the Odyssey, Pilot, and Ridgeline. The diesel engine was supposed to give these vehicles a 30 increase in fuel economy.

While Honda has made an effort to embrace all-electric vehicles with the recently showcased EV-N concept, Honda's CEO continues to state that hydrogen is the future for consumer vehicles.



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Who is buying these green vehicles
By KnightBreed on 10/23/2009 12:49:35 PM , Rating: 2
I don't get it. The Prius is the only hybrid that sells in legitimate volume. Now every company has plans for more hybrids and electric vehicles, but where is the demand? Who is going to buy one?

I think all the automakers are in for an unfortunate surprise when the Leaf, Volt, and other hybrid/electrics from Ford, Chrysler, and Honda -- not to mention Fisker, Reva, Aptera, and Tesla -- hit the market in 2011/12 with a gigantic thud. That is a lot of new models for what is so far a very small market.




RE: Who is buying these green vehicles
By randomposter on 10/23/2009 12:57:00 PM , Rating: 2
Since when is the automobile market a very small market?

Seems to me there is more than enough demand for Toyota, Honda, Nissan, GM, Ford, Chrysler, Fisker, Reva, Aptera, Tesla, and more. I'm pretty sure 90% of end consumers wouldn't care if the car is hybrid if it does essentially the same things at essentially the same price.


By Redwin on 10/23/2009 1:25:52 PM , Rating: 2
at essentially the same price -- This is the problem with your statement.

A hybrid drive-train will not be the same price (not even "essentially" so) as a traditional drive-train for a very long time, if ever. Combining 2 power sources with complicated gearing simply takes a good bit more engineering and money than using 1 engine with a normal transmission.


RE: Who is buying these green vehicles
By Noya on 10/24/2009 5:17:09 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
I don't get it. The Prius is the only hybrid that sells in legitimate volume. Now every company has plans for more hybrids and electric vehicles, but where is the demand? Who is going to buy one?


Have you been in a cave the last year or so?

Don't you know the whole "going green" initiative is going to save the world AND our economy? (sarcasm)

The government will CAFE and carbon tax people and companies into "going green."


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