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IBM and Ubuntu Linux supporter team up to compete with Microsoft Windows 7

IBM and the lead company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system announced plans to team up for cloud-based desktop services that will be available in the United States.

Canonical, the quiet backer behind Ubuntu, hopes to gain higher market presence with the use of a cloud Linux desktop suite designed for netbooks and other low-end PCs.  The IBM Client for Smart Work originally launched in South Africa – it is designed for emerging markets -- but is seeing higher demand in North America and Europe.

The software package for U.S. users includes Lotus Symphony, which includes word processing, Lotus Notes, LotusLive.com collaboration tools, and LotusLive iNotes.

It's an interesting working agreement since the OS will give users the benefit of cloud computing, but also has a physical operating system environment for users to interact with.

The IBM-Canonical partnership comes before the much-anticipated launch of Microsoft Windows 7, which Microsoft hopes will erase the bad memory of its Windows Vista OS.

Research firm Chadwick Martin Bailey recently conducted a survey in which 51% of large companies asked said they'd standardize Windows 7 installations on desktops and notebooks, with 38% of those surveyed saying netbooks will have Windows 7 in the next couple of years.

"Our data shows a remarkably high number of organizations planning to standardize on the new Windows 7 operating system in the near-term," Chadwick Martin Bailey VP Chris Neal told USA Today.  "Those who are holding back for the time being are more commonly staying with XP, rather than Vista.”



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Taken more seriously
By drycrust on 10/21/2009 11:24:51 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
IBM and Ubuntu Linux supporter team up to compete with Microsoft Windows 7


I think the big advantages of having IBM on board is it gives Ubuntu some corporate credibility and it enables, at least in theory anyway, them to know more about what is in the ROM chip on a PC.

The big problem for Ubuntu is while many of the more important general applications (e.g. Microsoft Office suite) have a Linux equivalent, my observation is many companies require additional software which they have purchased or developed to do things specific to their line of business, and that software won't have a Linux equivalent nor will it run reliably using Wine.

In regards to cloud computing, unless a cloud spreadsheet can do things like macros and sorting data it is pretty much a waste of time. My observation of Google Docs and Zoho is neither can do bot of these, and as far as I know they are the two best online websites to provide the "cloud" type services. I will be interested to see if the Lotus cloud spreadsheet will be different.




RE: Taken more seriously
By cfaalm on 10/22/2009 6:39:19 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
companies require additional software which they have purchased or developed to do things specific to their line of business


Not all of them require a Microsoft OS. It also is a trend within governments to have a long look at Linux and possibly steer away from Microsoft. Didn't Germany do this? My guess is that adequate support is key and this kept many companies from switching to Linux. This teaming up with IBM might just be the biggest incentive to switch to Linux.


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