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Print 29 comment(s) - last by 7Enigma.. on Oct 15 at 7:09 AM


Radeon HD 5770

Radeon HD 5750
ATI targets Windows 7 upgrades and new builds

ATI launched the first DirectX 11 parts less than a month ago. The Radeon HD 5870 and 5850 have been very popular due to their outstanding performance and future-proofed features. However, at MSRPs of $379 and $259 respectively, these cards occupy price points that many consumers are unwilling or unable to afford.

With the Windows 7 launch a little over a week away, ATI is preparing to serve the mainstream performance market by introducing two new cards. The Radeon HD 5770 and the Radeon HD 5750 with 1GB of GDDR5 will be introduced at $159 and $129 respectively. A 512MB Radeon HD 5750 version will also be introduced at $109. All cards in the Radeon 5700 series will have two DVI outputs, a HDMI output, and a DisplayPort output. Up to three monitors can be driven at the same time using a single card.

The Radeon 5700 series cards use a brand new 40nm chip previously codenamed Juniper. It consists of 1.04 billion transistors on a 166mm2 die, much smaller than the 334mm2 of the RV870 Evergreen chip used in the Radeon 5800 series. This enables ATI to hit the major pricing sweet spots in the  $100-$200 range.

Currently the Radeon HD 4890, 4870, 4850, and 4770 video cards are major sellers in that range. Based on nomenclature alone, a consumer might believe that the Radeon 5770 directly replaces the Radeon 4770. However, the Radeon 5770 is similar enough in performance to the Radeon 4850 that it will start to replace it as production ramps up. Our sources have indicated that there are tens of thousands of 5700 series video cards hitting retailers today, with many more already enroute across the Pacific Ocean.

The Radeon 4770 was the first card sold by ATI that used chips produced on the 40nm process. It will move into a lower price point, while the Radeon 4850 which uses GDDR3 memory will slowly disappear. The Radeon 4890 and 4870 will stick around for a while, but don't expect them to last beyond the first quarter of 2010 as ATI will continue transitioning production away from the 55nm node. All 5800 and 5700 series video cards use chips built using a 40nm process in Taiwan at TSMC.

ATI also plans to release another high end enthusiast graphics card within the next month. Codenamed Hemlock, it is expected to be released as the Radeon HD 5870 X2. New chips targeted for the early part of 2010 will bring DirectX 11 to the value and integrated markets. The Redwood chip is expected to debut as the Radeon HD 5600 series, while Cedar will be targeted mostly at OEMs.

With many consumers looking for a video card upgrade or building a new system thanks to the launch of Windows 7, ATI is in a very strong position with next generation hardware. NVIDIA is preparing their response, but we will have to wait for now.

 

Radeon HD 5870

Radeon HD 5850

Radeon HD 5770

Radeon HD 5750

Radeon HD 4870

Radeon HD 4850

Stream Processors

1600

1440

800

720

800

800

Texture Units

80

72

40

36

40

40

ROPs

32

32

16

16

16

16

Core Clock

850MHz

725MHz

850MHz

700MHz

750MHz

625MHz

Memory Clock

1.2GHz (4.8GHz data rate) GDDR5

1GHz (4GHz data rate) GDDR5

1.2GHz (4.8GHz data rate) GDDR5

1.15GHz (4.6GHz data rate) GDDR5

900MHz (3600MHz data rate) GDDR5

993MHz (1986MHz data rate) GDDR3

Memory Bus Width

256-bit

256-bit

128-bit

128-bit

256-bit

256-bit

Frame Buffer

1GB

1GB

1GB

1GB / 512MB

1GB

1GB / 512MB

Transistor Count

2.15B

2.15B

1.04B

1.04B

956M

956M

TDP

188W

151W

108W

86W

150W

110W

Price Point

$379

$259

$159

$129 / $109

$140-$160

$109-$129



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RE: The 57XXs are more or less 48XXs with DX11
By sc3252 on 10/13/2009 11:39:22 AM , Rating: 4
I think the bigger issue that may happen for Nvidia is developers targeting ATI hardware now that it is in the open instead of Nvidia hardware.


RE: The 57XXs are more or less 48XXs with DX11
By jonmcc33 on 10/13/2009 11:49:18 AM , Rating: 2
Are you referring to PhysX? That would be true.


By sc3252 on 10/13/2009 11:56:05 AM , Rating: 2
I was thinking more how game engines are made. Nvidia had a big jump on ATI when the 2900xt finally came out, if ATI has the same type of lead it might mean a reversal where more game engines are programed for ATI since they will probably control more market share in DirectX 11 than Nvidia. Of course I always figured they would have a big lead in games because of the Xbox 360, but that didn't happen...


RE: The 57XXs are more or less 48XXs with DX11
By Amiga500 on 10/13/2009 11:58:44 AM , Rating: 2
Indeed. Good point.

It is quite well known that ATi's approach requires a much more optimised software engine interface, whereas Nvidia's is more general, and able to take any engine and perform reasonably well with it.

An analogy would be ATi's Ferrari compared to Nvidia's Audi R8... the Ferrari (ATi) is quicker, if you get it set-up right and drive well, whereas the R8 (Nvidia) is far more accessible, but doesn't quite have the ultimate performance potential.

If ATi can get the developers on-side, then we would see ATi's regularly outperform the GeForce line in a manner similar to DiRT and DiRT 2.


By Sazar on 10/13/2009 3:00:58 PM , Rating: 2
I think the Skyline GT-R would have been a better v/s for the Ferrari :D

But fair point.

Still, considering that AMD's solution is running pretty much everything pretty well, it doesn't seem to be as much of a finesse solution as you make it out to be. It appears to be able to run all games pretty well.

There are some areas where it trips up, but on the whole, the performance is pretty good, top to bottom, right now with AMD, especially when you factor in the price.


RE: The 57XXs are more or less 48XXs with DX11
By someguy123 on 10/14/2009 12:16:39 AM , Rating: 3
I don't think the issue is with nvidia having a more streamlined API, i think the issue is that nvidia was willing to work closer with devs, give more money or parts, and had more marketshare. The difference in baseline performance before optimizing for whatever company's API should be negligible.

the person above you talking about ATi going "open" is that they're creating their physics engine on an open platform (openCL). since this platform is royalty free, developers are likely to have better support for ATi products.


By someguy123 on 10/14/2009 12:19:33 AM , Rating: 2
edit: should be supporting an open platform, not just creating a physics engine.


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