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Setting up a Windows XP drivers CD

Selectable startup disk
Intel-Macs owners now have an official second OS option

Ever since the release of Apple's Intel-based Macs, the user community has been attempting to find ways to install Windows XP on their Macs. Because of issues regarding how Apple has designed its new computers, initial attempts at installing Windows XP were met with frustration. While a method has now been devised to install Windows, most users are staying away due to the complexity of the method and the risks involved. Lack of proper drivers is also a factor.

Today however, Apple has released what it calls Boot Camp Beta, a download for current Intel-Mac owners that allows them to install Windows XP without hacking their Windows XP installation CD. Apple says that in its next major release of OS X, called Leopard, Boot Camp will be fully integrated. For now, users can download the 85MB Boot Camp Beta directly from Apple's website.

Boot Camp lets you install Windows XP without moving your Mac data, though you will need to bring your own copy to the table, as Apple Computer does not sell or support Microsoft Windows. Boot Camp will burn a CD of all the required drivers for Windows so you don't have to scrounge around the Internet looking for them.

Apple's Boot Camp will also provide users with officially working drivers to get their Windows XP up and running. Thanks Orochi for the head's up!

The official Apple guide is available here (PDF).

Update: We have confirmed that this does work however, those who choose to go into domain login mode in Windows XP, beware: the MacBook Pro does not have a "delete" key. The DELETE key on the MacBook Pro is actually Backspace. Since Windows XP requires that you press CTRL + ALT + DEL in order to login in domain mode, this won't be possible unless you attach an external USB keyboard with a real Delete key or disable secure domain login mode (turns off the CTRL ALT DEL request) before restarting Windows XP to apply domain login mode.


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By vsridhar420 on 4/5/2006 10:15:35 AM , Rating: 3
On the contarary, this move will let users to do a side by side comparision of the two operating systems and choose the best one. Over the years Mac OS has never lagged Windows in terms of quality. Now with near zero cost when bought with apple hardware, more people will look forward to using Mac OS than before since they can be 'backward compatible'. Windows is soon going to become a legacy OS which people will use when they have to run some of their old apps.

Apple also will definitely gain from this move.


RE: The Second Step on the Intel-brick road....
By mpeny on 4/5/2006 11:11:12 AM , Rating: 2
There is still a cost difference.


RE: The Second Step on the Intel-brick road....
By Bonrock on 4/5/2006 11:36:04 AM , Rating: 2
And it's quite a significant cost difference. Not only will you have to spend the extra money to buy a Mac, you'll also have to throw down the extra cash to buy your second OS (Windows). Well, assuming you have the integrity to do so.


RE: The Second Step on the Intel-brick road....
By jbs181818 on 4/5/2006 12:36:38 PM , Rating: 2
You can legally install Windows on line 3 of your own computers. So, if you already have windows, its free.


RE: The Second Step on the Intel-brick road....
By obeseotron on 4/5/2006 12:48:37 PM , Rating: 2
What are you talking about? A Windows license is good for one computer, legally.


RE: The Second Step on the Intel-brick road....
By SSNYT on 4/5/2006 1:14:29 PM , Rating: 2
2 if you have the OEM version. one static, one for mobile.


By ebakke on 4/5/2006 2:53:25 PM , Rating: 2
I could be wrong, but from my readings in the past you're referring to the Office EULA. Windows: 1 key, 1 machine.


By bob661 on 4/5/2006 2:55:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
2 if you have the OEM version. one static, one for mobile.
That's correct sir!


By Bonrock on 4/5/2006 1:45:19 PM , Rating: 3
You can legally install Windows on line 3 of your own computers. So, if you already have windows, its free.

It sounds like instead of reading the Windows license agreement, you just made up your own license agreement that suited your needs.


RE: The Second Step on the Intel-brick road....
By blwest on 4/5/2006 3:22:37 PM , Rating: 1
There is also a HUGE quality difference. I buy mac hardware because it's well engineered. It doesn't look like some huge laptop produced by dell. 1" is enough (that's what she said, not me, I swear) I hope dell quits producing near 2" thick notebooks and begins to produce an engineered prodcuct.


By h04x on 4/5/2006 4:28:40 PM , Rating: 4
Sigh, fanboiism at it's finest.


RE: The Second Step on the Intel-brick road....
By creathir on 4/6/2006 10:24:29 AM , Rating: 3
Well engineered??? It is the SAME stuff as what is inside the Windows PCs now...
SAME chipsets...
SAME CPU...
SAME graphics cards...
I guess their layout of their motherboards are supperior?
- Creathir


By wallijonn on 4/6/2006 12:37:20 PM , Rating: 2
[quote] It is the SAME stuff as what is inside the Windows PCs now...
SAME chipsets...
SAME CPU...
SAME graphics cards...
I guess their layout of their motherboards are supperior? [/quote]

That could very well be the case. Remember when a lot of motherboards had bad caps? ("Popcorning") Apples could use higher quality parts, have superior board layouts, etc. (Although I would think that it was the Intel engineers who crafted their new MacTel mobos. That alone may guarantee longer board life.) As far as the "same graphics cards" go, we may have to wait and see. I feel that the one thing that kept Macs from getting more marketshare was the fact that there were very few games for Macs (and Mac-ATI boards usually cost a premium over their PC brethern.) I'd like to know if the new Intel-Macs use the same power supplies as the PCs (just in case you need more juice for that new vid card.)


"What would I do? I'd shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders." -- Michael Dell, after being asked what to do with Apple Computer in 1997

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