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Audi e-tron
Concept has four electric motors and a single battery pack

The world of electric and hybrid vehicles is progressing and growing at a rapid pace. While most people still think of hybrids and electric vehicles as low performance machines, there are an increasing number of high-performance electric vehicles being unveiled.

The first high performance EV was the Tesla Roadster with good performance thanks to the impressive torque of the electric motor. Audio has unveiled its latest concept car at the International Motor Show in Frankfurt called the Audi e-tron which just so happens to look like an electrified Audi R8.

The most impressive feature of the concept isn’t just its all-electric power train, but its tremendous amount of torque. Audi claims that the e-tron has a torque rating of  3,319.03 lb-ft. All that torque is generated by four individual electric motors situated at each wheel allowing the vehicle to be all-wheel drive.

The car has a total of 313 HP and promises to hit 60 mph in about 4.8 seconds. A more impressive number is that the car can go from about 37 mph to 74 mph in only 4.1 seconds. The all-electric range for the lithium-ion battery pack is 154 miles.

The EV is a large beast at 3,527 pounds and it measures in at 74.5-inches wide x 167.72-inches long and 48.43-inches tall with a wheelbase of 102.36-inches. The massive single battery pack alone weighs 1,036 pounds.

"We are trying to find a concept that requires no compromises," says Michael Dick, Member of the Board of Management of AUDI AG, Technical Development. "Electromobility means more to us than just electrifying conventional cars. Instead, we are dedicated to a holistic approach to all aspects of the topic."

Audi's American President called potential Volt buyers idiots not long ago and then quickly claimed he forgot what he said. There was only speculation surrounding the Audio EV concept at the time the comments were made.



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RE: <Drool>
By fic2 on 9/15/2009 1:33:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
3,000 ft-lbs of torque is useless in a sports car. How do you couple it to the road? The car will just sit and burn rubber for a while, but you can do that with far less torque.


It's pretty easy to program the "gearing" so that the tires don't burn rubber. Tesla already does this. They take apply max power until the tires slip, then back off. Rinse, repeat.


RE: <Drool>
By Spuke on 9/15/09, Rating: 0
RE: <Drool>
By Amiga500 on 9/15/2009 2:23:32 PM , Rating: 2
Read about gearing and torque multiplication.


RE: <Drool>
By theapparition on 9/15/2009 3:27:12 PM , Rating: 3
No clue where you came up with this number.

Not to beat a dead horse, but that 3000ft-lbs is divided by each tire, or 750ft-lbs/tire.
A C5 would have approx 1800ft-lbs to each of the rear wheels (assming posi traction), and while you can get some slippage in a base C5, it is minimal and well within the capability of the stock run-crap tires they used to put on there. Add decent rubber, and you're fine. A LS3 C6 would even put more down, approx 2200ft-lbs per tire, and that is fine as well.

Go to R compound tires and even 4000ft-lbs is a non-issue at the track. Take that a step further to wide slicks and that number goes up further. My C5 drag car puts out 9000ft-lbs at the wheels! Hoosier slicks have never disappointed me.

So net effect is this car would actually be slower than most modern Corvettes, Porshes, and even ricer STi's while tires wouldn't even be an issue. A fact that the released performance numbers confirm, despite the sensationalist headline.


RE: <Drool>
By Spuke on 9/16/2009 11:39:38 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
A C5 would have approx 1800ft-lbs to each of the rear wheels
Again, if a C5 has 1800 lb-ft of torque at the rear wheels, what does a Dynojet measure?


RE: <Drool>
By Spuke on 9/16/2009 11:41:34 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Go to R compound tires and even 4000ft-lbs is a non-issue at the track. Take that a step further to wide slicks and that number goes up further.
I'm not talking about specialty tires, I'm talking about tires are put on street cars from the factory which 99.9% of the population will be using. A set of Michelin PS2's ain't putting down 3000 lb-ft to the pavement without electronic nannies.


RE: <Drool>
By theapparition on 9/16/2009 1:06:49 PM , Rating: 2
Michelin P/S 2 (great tire BTW) come in various sizes, including 335 width. Do you actually mean to imply that a P/S 2 in a 335 coudn't handle more than a similar 195 width. There are quite a wide variety of P/S 2 tires sold on cars, but since we are talking about sports cars, yes, I believe they are 335 P/S 2's on the ZR1. So a blanket statement that 99.9% of tires couldn't hold xxxx torque is pretty misleading.

Weight of the car, contact patch, and rubber compound all contribute to the amount of friction force that the tire is capable of.

Now, keep in mind, that torque I talked about is at the shaft, you now have to divide that by the moment arm (also known as tire radius) to find out what the pavement/rubber interface force will be.

You can disbelieve all you want, but fact remains that quoted performance numbers match closely towards conventional gas engine cars of 10x "less" rated torque.


RE: <Drool>
By Spuke on 9/17/2009 1:36:31 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
You can disbelieve all you want, but fact remains that quoted performance numbers match closely towards conventional gas engine cars of 10x "less" rated torque.
it's not about disbelief, it's about you guys not explaining yourselves. I'm asking the questions to get an explanation. When I take my car to the dyno, the sheet doesn't say I have 3000 lb-ft it says I have 220. Yet you guys are saying that a C5 actually puts down X 1000 lb-ft of torque to the road. If that is so, what does a Dynojet measure?


RE: <Drool>
By theapparition on 9/17/2009 4:03:07 PM , Rating: 2
Answered above.


RE: <Drool>
By 91TTZ on 9/20/2009 9:35:53 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
When I take my car to the dyno, the sheet doesn't say I have 3000 lb-ft it says I have 220. Yet you guys are saying that a C5 actually puts down X 1000 lb-ft of torque to the road. If that is so, what does a Dynojet measure?


I think that the majority of people replying in this thread have little to no knowledge of how cars or dyno's work.

I'll do my best to answer your question:

When you dyno your car they make you put it in 4th gear to do the pull. They do this to get it as close to a 1:1 ratio through the tranny as possible. From the spark plug clamp they know what RPM your engine is turning, and the dyno computer already knows what RPM the drum is turning. It's all math from there. They aren't going to show you a 10x multiplication because your ratio is about 1:1 during the pull. In addition, even if you pulled it in 1st gear and you had a 10x gearing multiple, the dyno computer would divide it by some ratio between engine rpm and drum rpm.


RE: <Drool>
By 91TTZ on 9/20/2009 9:40:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
When I take my car to the dyno, the sheet doesn't say I have 3000 lb-ft it says I have 220. Yet you guys are saying that a C5 actually puts down X 1000 lb-ft of torque to the road. If that is so, what does a Dynojet measure?


I think that the majority of people replying in this thread have little to no knowledge of how cars or dyno's work.

I'll do my best to answer your question:

When you dyno your car they make you put it in 4th gear to do the pull. They do this to get it as close to a 1:1 ratio through the tranny as possible. From the spark plug clamp they know what RPM your engine is turning, and the dyno computer already knows what RPM the drum is turning. It's all math from there. They aren't going to show you a 10x multiplication because your ratio is about 1:1 during the pull. In addition, even if you pulled it in 1st gear and you had a 10x gearing multiple, the dyno computer would divide it by some ratio between engine rpm and drum rpm.


RE: <Drool>
By Spuke on 9/17/2009 1:43:20 PM , Rating: 2
You said,
quote:
Go to R compound tires and even 4000ft-lbs is a non-issue at the track. T

I said,
quote:
I'm not talking about specialty tires, I'm talking about tires are put on street cars from the factory


Michelin PS2's are regular street tires and I have yet to see a twin turbo Viper with 1000+ lb-ft of torque NOT smoke a set. I have yet to see a Solstice with 300 lb-ft NOT smoke a set. FACT, todays STREET tires can't hold the torque that this Audi will will be putting down, especially at that super low rpm, without electronic nannies.


RE: <Drool>
By theapparition on 9/17/2009 4:01:39 PM , Rating: 2
If you put a wide enough tire on any car, it will hold fine.

I only took issue with your 280ft-lb comment that seemed to be pulled from air. Can you supply some sort of data that supports a street tires limit of grip at 280ft-lbs. If not, than admit it was just a WAG.


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