backtop


Print 43 comment(s) - last by maven81.. on Sep 10 at 7:38 PM

The future of the U.S. manned shuttle mission is considered bleak, as NASA needs at least $3 billion more per year

The U.S. Human Space Flight Plans Committee now believes NASA must come up with an additional $3 billion per year to be able to launch manned missions to the moon or to Mars.

The committee said the U.S. space agency absolutely must rely more on private contractors to help fly astronauts back to the International Space Station, and other low Earth-orbit destinations.  Five years ago during the Bush era, it was planned for NASA to get back to the moon by 2020 -- a goal that is extremely unlikely to be met.

Although China, Russia, Japan, India, and the United States all have outlined plans to get back to the moon, it seems like Mars is the true goal for every major space nation.

"You can say that Mars is a destination, but it's really more like Mars is a goal because we're not setting a date," said Leroy Chiao, a member of the 10-person committee, who spoke with Reuters.  "It's saying these are the things we need to do to build up the infrastructure to get to Mars, this is how much money we have now, and we'll see in the next several years what we think we can get done. Then it'll be for the next budget cycles after that to figure out when we might actually get to Mars."

China is expected to be the next country to reach the moon again, according to U.S. space officials, noting there just isn't enough funding going into NASA's long-term manned missions.

Furthermore, the current fleet of space shuttles, which were supposed to be retired in 2010, will likely fly into 2011, the panel said.  President Barack Obama's advisers will analyze the committee's findings, but it's unknown when the president will begin to outline what lies ahead for NASA over the next few years.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Misty Dingos your miss informed
By mugiebahar on 9/9/2009 10:26:03 AM , Rating: 1
Your wrong I'm sorry to say, the government did not spend ten trillion dollars on the recovery, it's more like 1.5 trillion 700 billion with bush and 800 billion with Obama. 10 trillion is the total debt of Americans owing to other nations such as China and Japan.

Human lives are more important then the moon or Mars. We should care for our fellow man before vein things such as who reaches the moon again first or Mars for that fact. Besides if anyone in NASA really cared about going to the moon then why don't they all volunteer there time and stop getting paid the 6 figure incomes or more they all seem to have.

Also a toilet seat should not cost $25,000. Hell NASA spent 1 million on a pen that could write in space. The soviets are smarter they just used a pencil.




RE: Misty Dingos your miss informed
By Lhyet on 9/9/2009 10:46:00 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Hell NASA spent 1 million on a pen that could write in space. The soviets are smarter they just used a pencil.


And then had to deal with tiny pieces of wood and lead that broke off during writing which would float around in space and cause a health hazard.

There's a reason for everything~


By mugiebahar on 9/9/2009 3:53:43 PM , Rating: 2
Please read this link,
.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_public_...
The total debt now carried by the U.S is estimated at close to 10 trillion not 10 trillion a year.


RE: Misty Dingos your miss informed
By werepossum on 9/10/2009 1:06:28 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And then had to deal with tiny pieces of wood and lead that broke off during writing which would float around in space and cause a health hazard. There's a reason for everything~

Graphite is highly conductive and makes very small particles. Anyone who would use pencils in a zero G environment is either hatter mad, Biden stupid, or funded by an economic system which can afford nothing better.


RE: Misty Dingos your miss informed
By maven81 on 9/10/2009 7:38:12 PM , Rating: 2
Then I guess NASA is stupid because you two are quoting an urban legend.
Both the Soviets and NASA used pencils. And the space pen wasn't developed by NASA, it was developed by the Parker company, who gave it to NASA for free (if memory serves). A PR stunt.


By MrBlastman on 9/9/2009 11:11:38 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
Human lives are more important then the moon or Mars.


You are right, they are! That is why we NEED to further our spacefaring ability.

Why?

Because if we don't, mankind WILL eventually blow itself to pieces, it is inevitable. Global peace is a fallacy and can never occur. Man will always try to best the next man.

So, if you really want to save millions of lives, you will encourage spending on space exploration. Getting us of this rock is imperative to the advancement of society. Sure, we'll still kill each other in space, but at least we won't be confined to a single petri dish anymore.


By FITCamaro on 9/9/2009 12:12:10 PM , Rating: 2
No YOU'RE wrong.

The stimulus will cost far more than the 800 billion. And if they're able to tack on government run health care and cap and trade, we might as well just start burning our money since it won't be worth anything. Sh*t a penny is already worth less than a penny.

And I can assure you, not everyone at NASA makes 6 figures. And those who do, earn it. And the space toilet cost over a million. Why? Well why don't we shoot you into space and let you discover how much more complicated taking a piss or a crap is in a zero-g environment.


By JKflipflop98 on 9/9/2009 6:19:13 PM , Rating: 2
"Hell NASA spent 1 million on a pen that could write in space. The soviets are smarter they just used a pencil."

Wrong on both counts. See what taking in TV shows as education does?

http://history.nasa.gov/spacepen.html


"Nowadays, security guys break the Mac every single day. Every single day, they come out with a total exploit, your machine can be taken over totally. I dare anybody to do that once a month on the Windows machine." -- Bill Gates

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki