backtop


Print 24 comment(s) - last by ChristopherO.. on Sep 8 at 9:46 PM


Lexus RX 450h

Lexus HS 250h

Toyota Prius
An important green milestone comes for the company

Whether you love Toyota's hybrids or don't care for them, its hard to fault Toyota's strategy from a business standpoint.  Demand is at a record high and the manufacturer is making profit on-level with traditional sedan designs, thanks to various cost cuts.  And with August sales in the books, the automaker has announced that it has reached a significant milestone: selling its two-millionth hybrid vehicle.

Toyota was the first to create a mass-production hybrid, when it launched the Prius in 1997.  Since then it has seen strong demand for that vehicle as it has evolved over three generations.  Meanwhile, Toyota has fleshed out its hybrid offerings with Toyota Camry, Toyota Highlander, Lexus GS 450h, Lexus RX 450h, and LS 600h hybrids.  More hybrids from Toyota and Lexus are also in the works.

Later this year Toyota will launch the Lexus HS 250h, a new luxury hybrid vehicle.  The vehicle will join 13 hybrid vehicles currently in the company's lineup (though many of these are Japan-only models).  Toyota continues to advance on its plan to by 2020 launch a hybrid version of every vehicle in its lineup, as well as continuing to offer hybrid-only offerings like the Prius.

On May 31, 2007 Toyota topped one million hybrids sold.  Toyota estimates that since 1997 its hybrids have reduced CO2 emissions by 11 million tons (based on a comparison of fuel economy of sedans of similar size and class).

In the next decade, Toyota hopes to be selling 1 million hybrid vehicles a year.

Toyota does face growing competition in the market.  Rival Japanese automaker Nissan will be launching an pure electric vehicle, the Leaf EV in 2011.  Both Nissan and Honda are also expanding their hybrid lineups, with Honda's Insight posting modest sales, despite lukewarm reviews.  German automakers are also pushing ahead with clean diesel and hybrid offerings and the U.S. automakers all have growing hybrid lineups, as well plans for electric vehicles.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Update after 3 years
By mmcdonalataocdotgov on 9/8/2009 7:40:42 AM , Rating: 3
After 3 years of owning a hybrid, I have saved more than $4,500.00 in gas costs, which paid for the hybrid, not to mention the tax credit - so I have made back twice the cost of the hybrid. Plus I have used about 1,500 fewer gallons of gasoline, all while putting on the same number of miles per year. And, there was no need to upgrade any energy services, like electricity, and in fact I reduced the load on the current petrol infrastructure. Diesels would do the same thing - except we will get Mexican made VW's, so that saves more energy since they will be broken down a lot (I have owned one.)

Honda has always bet on the "performance hybrid" model, except for the anemic Insight. And that product model has failed, that is why they pulled the Accord hybrid.




RE: Update after 3 years
By rtrski on 9/8/2009 10:29:04 AM , Rating: 2
Ditto - I've more than saved the oft-quoted "$4-5k markup" for the hybrid in gas prices at this point (4 years into my 2001 model, using a 30mpg 'average' as my comparison), my maintenance has been nothing more then oil changes, air filters, and fluids, I'm only into a 2nd set of tires as the ones it came with lasted about 58k miles, and my batteries are good for another 50k miles by warranty. (And there are reports of Prii battery packs lasting 250k miles already, so there's no need to believe I'll be clubbed by the failbat at 150k miles exactly.)

Even excluding the $3k tax credit I got on purchase, it has been an economical purchase for me. Sure, I'd be in about the same overall financial situation if I'd bought a Jetta TDI or whatnot (maybe - maintenance might have cost a bit more by the 100k mile point, and while average mileage might work out to be near the 48 MPG lifetime I've got now diesel was spiking a bit higher than gas over some of the last 4 years). The hybrid wasn't a huge "win" in economy terms vs. other technologies in similar size and trim level vehicles, but neither was it a loser.

Plus the cognitive dissonance of working in a right-wing-type defense engineering job while driving what is usually considered a tree-hugging ecofreak vehicle is always good for a laugh. I've heard them all at this point...


RE: Update after 3 years
By Spuke on 9/8/2009 2:15:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Plus the cognitive dissonance of working in a right-wing-type defense engineering job while driving what is usually considered a tree-hugging ecofreak vehicle is always good for a laugh.
I work for the gov too and know plenty of people with hybrids (Prius' too) with conservative views. Not everyone needs to make a political/social statement with their cars. Most people just need something to get from point A to B.


RE: Update after 3 years
By Spuke on 9/8/2009 2:13:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
After 3 years of owning a hybrid, I have saved more than $4,500.00 in gas costs, which paid for the hybrid
You only paid $4500 for a used Hybrid? I'd buy one at that price. You got a good deal.


"If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion." -- Scientology founder L. Ron. Hubbard














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki