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Nokia N900
N900 promises PC like multitasking capability

Nokia is looking for every edge it can sharpen in its fight with Apple and RIM for the high-end smartphone market. Smartphones are growing in popularity and Nokia is seeing its market share drop faster than average rates in the industry.

DailyTech reported yesterday that Nokia would be unveiling a new high-end smartphone at Nokia World that ran Maemo. Today Nokia has made the Linux-derived Maemo device a reality with the official announcement.

The new Nokia N900 packs an ARM Coretex-A8 CPU in with up to 1GB of application memory and OpenGL ES 2.0 graphics acceleration. According to Nokia, the result of the powerful processor and the Maemo OS is that users of the N900 get a PC-like multitasking experience. Nokia says the power of the N900 allows many applications to run simultaneously.

The N900 features a slide-out QWERTY keyboard and supports up to ten personal email addresses. The device is designed for easy texting and email and sports 32GB of onboard storage. Memory expansion is offered with up to 16GB via a microSD card. The device sports a 5-megapixel camera with Carl Zeiss optics.

"With Linux software, Mozilla-based browser technology and now also with cellular connectivity, the Nokia N900 delivers a powerful mobile experience," says Anssi Vanjoki, Executive Vice President, Markets, Nokia. "The Nokia N900 shows where we are going with Maemo and we'll continue to work with the community to push the software forward. What we have with Maemo is something that is fusing the power of the computer, the internet and the mobile phone, and it is great to see that it is evolving in exciting ways."

Nokia says its N900 supports Adobe Flash 9.4, something lacking from the iPhone. Other features of the handset include a high-resolution WVGA touch screen, HSPA internet connectivity and integrated Wi-Fi. The handset runs the Mozilla web browser. Nokia expects to launch the N900 in October for select markets at a price of 500 EUR.



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RE: Looks....
By Mojo the Monkey on 8/27/2009 1:05:19 PM , Rating: -1
Oh goody, yet another mobile OS platform.

Maybe someone can explain this to me, if they are going to go with a new OS, why not adopt Android (free, right?) and then make the tweaks to the GUI and overall user experience as they see fit? I understand that a great deal of customization is afforded to the OEM's (see the HERO, etc. vs the G1).

This would allow them to start with a widely tested, much updated/patched, stable OS and have access to the wide variety of Android programs.

If I am missing something, or am wrong about one of my above assumptions, please let me know. I just dont understand.


RE: Looks....
By jRaskell on 8/27/2009 1:26:21 PM , Rating: 5
The Maemo platform has been Nokia's primary mobile platform (not just for smartphones, but was originally for tablet PCs) for around half a decade now. So your assumption that it is a new OS is completely false. It's just getting more attention because that's what the cell phone market is focusing on these days.


RE: Looks....
By Mojo the Monkey on 8/27/2009 2:04:58 PM , Rating: 2
Thanks for the clarification. All of the language about new software development and "showing where Maemo is going" gave me the impression that this was somehow new - perhaps a drastic change in the underlying architecture. My mistake

In that case, disregard my post. I do, however, wish that WebOS/Maemo/Android could join forces one day.


RE: Looks....
By segerstein on 9/1/2009 3:45:43 PM , Rating: 2
Maemo is Linux based, whose kernel is mature.

Nokia has been offering Nxxx tablets for quite a while. But they were 250g beasts.

Now the components have miniaturized, so a Linux based computer can be crammed into a bit less, ie 181g.


RE: Looks....
By mforce on 8/27/2009 1:59:24 PM , Rating: 2
Seriously now if you were the nr. 1 phone manufacturer in the world would you use an OS made by Google. It might be free and it might also be OK for the smaller companies out there but Nokia is in a position where they can and should have their own OS.
Just look what happened to other phone manufacturers that depended on Windows Mobile , Apple came with their own OS and swiped the floor with them.
Google takes all the decisions in Android development even if phone manufacturers get to modify it and stuff.
I don't even like Android with all their Java stuff , Maemo uses native code which should be better.
Google is getting too strong anyway , they really do need the competition.


RE: Looks....
By adiposity on 8/27/2009 4:02:30 PM , Rating: 2
I believe the phrase is "wiped the floor"

:)


RE: Looks....
By chagrinnin on 8/28/2009 2:21:41 AM , Rating: 2
Dora: Wiper! No Wiping! Wiper! No Wiping! Wiper! No Wiping!

Apple: OOH! Man! (snap!)


RE: Looks....
By drycrust on 8/27/2009 1:59:29 PM , Rating: 2
There is a logic to using a different Linux version, although it isn't, on the face of it, an economical one nor a good customer service one nor a longevity one. By having slightly different Linux Operating Systems it will, over time, show which versions are better and better supported, and which ones aren't. For example, I have tried all the main Linux OSs and have gone back to Ubuntu (fairly new) simply because it has less problems than any other version of Linux and that when I do have a problem I can generally find a solution.
If the people behind Ubuntu had tried to improve Fedora or OpenSuse or PCLinuxOS then they would still be hamstrung by the lack of control over the direction the OS improvements and repairs take. As it is, they get their own brand recognition and now lead the other Linux flavours in DIY customer service and ability to compete with Windows XP. No, they aren't there yet, but they are getting there.


RE: Looks....
By Hare on 8/27/2009 3:11:16 PM , Rating: 2
Nokia has their own service suite called OVI. It has appstore, music store, sync services, photo sharing, chat, etc etc. Using android with google services would be playing straight to the pockets of Google. OVI services are quite competitive so it's interesting to see how this turns out.

...and Maemo is superior to android from both consumer and developer perspective.


RE: Looks....
By sdsdv10 on 8/27/2009 4:17:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
...and Maemo is superior to android from both consumer and developer perspective.


Explain please.


RE: Looks....
By sprockkets on 8/27/2009 5:06:16 PM , Rating: 5
Consider:

1. You find that Maemo has http://maemo.org, a community driven app development, all the tools to run those apps kernel level, not just on a java layer or whatever both Android and webOS do. In other words, Maemo is more "Linux" oriented in development than those other Linux based OSes

2. This: http://flors.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/screensho...


"Google fired a shot heard 'round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people." -- Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)

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