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Low cost and integrated GPUs gain the most in Q2

GPU sales are looked at as an indicator of how well the overall computer market is doing since all computers today ship with a GPU of some sort be it of the discrete or integrated variety. So far, 2009 has been a rough year for GPU makers.

Typically, GPU makers would be disappointed with no significant growth, but with the poor economy, it's a welcome change from the significant declines other quarters have seen. Jon Peddie Research (JPR) has unveiled its latest numbers for the add-in GPU industry for Q2 2009. The numbers show that 16.81 million add-in units were shipped, up 3% from the previous quarter and down 15% from the same quarter in 2008.

Inventories had to be replenished over Q2 and JPR estimates that the replenishment at least shadowed consumption or was a bit higher. With the poor economy still hurting many consumers, sales in the GPU market moved downstream. Most of the growth in the GPU market was in the integrated segment with a 4% year-over-year increase in shipments for the quarter. Lower cost discrete cards also saw modest improvements according to JPR with higher cost discrete cards taking the worst the quarter had to offer.

The quarter was the first where AMD finally started to gain back some share from NVIDIA. JPR reports that AMD's unit share rose from 31% in Q1 to 35% in Q2 with NVIDIA seeing their share decline the same 4% to 64% overall. That means that AMD took every bit of its growth from NVIDIA's marketshare. NVIDIA and Intel GPU shipments did rebound slightly in Q1 2009.



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RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By Pirks on 8/26/2009 3:41:25 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
why anyone would buy an NVidia card
Because of atikmdag.sys BSODs
quote:
buying $300+ video cards, which I also don't understand
You gotta try Crysis to understand. I'm already saving for my next $300 DX11 GPU to be purchased right at the moment Crysis 2 hits the EA digital downloads. Investing $300 in a new GPU every two years is not that expensive actually :o)


RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By ClownPuncher on 8/26/2009 4:07:12 PM , Rating: 2
It all depends on how you purchase, when new products hit the market, and what programs can make use of it.

I was an early adopter for my old 8800GTS 512mb, paid about $300, but it was worth it as 8800GTX and Ultra were $500-700 at the time. I picked up a 4890 for my girl about 3 weeks back for ~$180, clocked it to 950mhz and didn't need to opt for the GTX 285. I'm now running a pair of 8800GTS g92 in sli, works fine for anything at 1680x1050 but I will be an early adopter for the Evergreen (5870?) since my 512mb frame buffer is becoming a bottleneck.

I usually skip a generation (nvidia naming schemes notwithstanding), but this time I didn't have a need for a GTX 280 or 4870. It's also good in my opinion to have a new card every other fall season, fall/winter games seem to be the best.


RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By FITCamaro on 8/27/2009 8:17:26 AM , Rating: 2
When is the 58xx series due?


RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By ClownPuncher on 8/27/2009 11:32:04 AM , Rating: 2
In a few weeks actually. I'm pretty excited this time, DX11 actually looks like a well optimized API and I think AMD has a little momentum after the 4xxx series. It might be the push we need to finally break free of DX9c and people clinging to winxp for gaming.


RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By monomer on 8/26/2009 4:56:30 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
Because of atikmdag.sys BSODs


Yes, I prefer the nvlddmkm.sys BSOD's myself.


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