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Low cost and integrated GPUs gain the most in Q2

GPU sales are looked at as an indicator of how well the overall computer market is doing since all computers today ship with a GPU of some sort be it of the discrete or integrated variety. So far, 2009 has been a rough year for GPU makers.

Typically, GPU makers would be disappointed with no significant growth, but with the poor economy, it's a welcome change from the significant declines other quarters have seen. Jon Peddie Research (JPR) has unveiled its latest numbers for the add-in GPU industry for Q2 2009. The numbers show that 16.81 million add-in units were shipped, up 3% from the previous quarter and down 15% from the same quarter in 2008.

Inventories had to be replenished over Q2 and JPR estimates that the replenishment at least shadowed consumption or was a bit higher. With the poor economy still hurting many consumers, sales in the GPU market moved downstream. Most of the growth in the GPU market was in the integrated segment with a 4% year-over-year increase in shipments for the quarter. Lower cost discrete cards also saw modest improvements according to JPR with higher cost discrete cards taking the worst the quarter had to offer.

The quarter was the first where AMD finally started to gain back some share from NVIDIA. JPR reports that AMD's unit share rose from 31% in Q1 to 35% in Q2 with NVIDIA seeing their share decline the same 4% to 64% overall. That means that AMD took every bit of its growth from NVIDIA's marketshare. NVIDIA and Intel GPU shipments did rebound slightly in Q1 2009.



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RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By bug77 on 8/26/2009 1:42:38 PM , Rating: 3
I don't know about everybody else, but I'll give you my reason: proper Linux support.


RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By stmok on 8/27/2009 3:44:18 AM , Rating: 3
Same here...In the Linux world, Nvidia is the better of the two. (Compared to ATI).

My three reasons for staying with Nvidia at this time are:

(1) CUDA framework is maintained with current distro versions.

(2) CUDA is easier to implement than ATI's Stream. (Also has a larger community).

(3) VDPAU => Only Nvidia based solutions have HD playback support under Linux. ATI has no equivalent.


RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By Spoelie on 8/27/2009 6:43:06 AM , Rating: 3
Every manufacturer has it's own API, even though they're all supposed to be open.
Intel - VA-API
AMD - XvBA
NVIDIA - VDPAU

Phoronix says:

To expose the video engine on newer ATI GPUs, Unified Video Decoder 2 (UVD2), AMD has been working to introduce X-Video Bitstream Acceleration on Linux. The XvBA shared library can be found starting with Catalyst 8.10, but there is no accompanying documentation, media player patches, or header file to make it usable. As we exclusively shared in our XvBA article, this new AMD video API for Linux is modeled after Microsoft's DxVA and provides GPU acceleration for iDCT, motion compensation, de-interlacing, and color correction. The formats to be initially supported by the X-Video Bitstream Acceleration are H.264, VC-1, and MPEG-2.

NVIDIA has developed and provided the header file for the VDPAU API along with some development documentation, but at this time, the support can only be found within NVIDIA's binary driver. It's not too likely VDPAU will find its way within AMD's proprietary Linux driver and it's unknown whether it will eventually find its way into any open-source driver.

VA-API (Video Acceleration API), which is another Intel spawned open-source project and it aims to provide hardware acceleration for video processing. Just over a month ago we shared that patches had emerged to support Intel's VA-API in MPlayer and FFmpeg. VA-API supports popular video formats such as MPEG-4 and VC-1 and is able to accelerate IDCT, Motion Compensation, LVC, bit-stream processing, and other functions, but this video API has not picked up much speed yet. The only display driver to have implemented support for VA-API in the hardware is Intel's closed-source driver (the one that's a bloody mess) for the Poulsbo chipset, which is found in a few select netbooks/nettops.


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