backtop


Print 80 comment(s) - last by .. on Aug 30 at 7:46 PM

Low cost and integrated GPUs gain the most in Q2

GPU sales are looked at as an indicator of how well the overall computer market is doing since all computers today ship with a GPU of some sort be it of the discrete or integrated variety. So far, 2009 has been a rough year for GPU makers.

Typically, GPU makers would be disappointed with no significant growth, but with the poor economy, it's a welcome change from the significant declines other quarters have seen. Jon Peddie Research (JPR) has unveiled its latest numbers for the add-in GPU industry for Q2 2009. The numbers show that 16.81 million add-in units were shipped, up 3% from the previous quarter and down 15% from the same quarter in 2008.

Inventories had to be replenished over Q2 and JPR estimates that the replenishment at least shadowed consumption or was a bit higher. With the poor economy still hurting many consumers, sales in the GPU market moved downstream. Most of the growth in the GPU market was in the integrated segment with a 4% year-over-year increase in shipments for the quarter. Lower cost discrete cards also saw modest improvements according to JPR with higher cost discrete cards taking the worst the quarter had to offer.

The quarter was the first where AMD finally started to gain back some share from NVIDIA. JPR reports that AMD's unit share rose from 31% in Q1 to 35% in Q2 with NVIDIA seeing their share decline the same 4% to 64% overall. That means that AMD took every bit of its growth from NVIDIA's marketshare. NVIDIA and Intel GPU shipments did rebound slightly in Q1 2009.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By inyafase on 8/26/2009 1:42:26 PM , Rating: 4
It is widely agreed that AMD/ATI has the performance crown when it comes to their HD 4xxx. That is of no question. It is also true that past a certain price point, nVidia regains that crown. However, most average people would fall in the former category.

Still, regardless of performance, there is the issue of support. nVidia's support has been in my opinion very good about rolling out driver updates on a consistent basis, even supporting cards from long ago. A client of mine bought a Radeon 9250 early last year. But when XP SP3 rolled out, he lost the ability to rotate his screens. I have heard of multiple issues of that sort, where a simply update to the display driver will do the trick. However, for that particular chipset, the last time it was updated was in 2006.

nVidia does not seem to be plagued by that. True, there cards are somewhat slower now, but their support remains quite superior. It's not always about performance. Same reason why people still buy Matrox cards.


RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By Parhel on 8/27/2009 9:04:54 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
A client of mine bought a Radeon 9250 early last year. But when XP SP3 rolled out, he lost the ability to rotate his screens.


That, I believe, was the last of the R200 chips. To put it in perspective, it's an eight year old chip, or the equivalent of the Geforce3 series. I'm not surprised it doesn't run 100% perfectly in 2009, and I doubt nVidia is still actively developing for the Geforce3 either.

Submit a bug report. You never know, they may fix it.


RE: Why Would You Buy NVidia?
By Ralos on 8/27/2009 11:58:56 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Same reason why people still buy Matrox cards.


Ahah! Good one!


"Game reviewers fought each other to write the most glowing coverage possible for the powerhouse Sony, MS systems. Reviewers flipped coins to see who would review the Nintendo Wii. The losers got stuck with the job." -- Andy Marken

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki