backtop


Print 32 comment(s) - last by HighWing.. on Sep 3 at 11:16 PM

Panasonic is working with popular Hollywood director to help promote 3D

Panasonic hopes to build up hype for 3DTV, this time announcing an agreement with "Titanic" director James Cameron, who will help promote 3D TVs in Japan and across the world.

"I believe 3D is how we will experience movies, gaming and computing in the near future," Cameron said, regarding his deal with Panasonic.  "We want to get global interest rolling," he continued.  "As a consumer electronics company, they are setting new standards in technology. Panasonic’s brilliance is demonstrated by their 3D presentation for the home.  I’ve had an opportunity to view Panasonic’s Full High Definition 3D technology first hand and it was remarkable."

The advertising deal makes sense as Cameron and Twentieth Century Fox Film prepare to release the movie "Avatar," a film that has been shot in 3D only.  Panasonic has rented several trailer-vans that will tour parts of the United States and Europe promoting the film, using a large-screen 3DTV on the outside of the van to show viewers trailer clips from "Avatar."

Even though several 3D animated films have been released in 3D only, "Avatar" will be the first live-action Hollywood movie to be released in 2D and 3D.

Although several other companies are working with 3D technology, including Sony, Samsung and others, there is a major issue that faces companies hoping to become involved in 3D.  There is no working agreement on broadcast or disc formats, which opens the door for a pricey format battle.

Last November, Panasonic submitted a proposal to the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) that would create guidelines for companies and studios using "left / right-eye two-channel Full HD images" on HDTVs with Blu-ray.  Furthermore, the company also created a 3D research lab in Hollywood, and gives researchers a place to develop 3D technology.

In the future, a 3D broadcast and disc format must be created -- and agreed upon -- by a majority of the companies, hopefully avoiding a content war.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

how
By SonicIce on 8/24/2009 8:50:56 AM , Rating: 3
so how exactly does it work? if you need glasses then i don't see it becoming anything more than a feeble escapade




RE: how
By MrPoletski on 8/24/2009 9:12:13 AM , Rating: 4
yeah but what if it did 3D pr0n!


RE: how
By Nobleman00 on 8/24/09, Rating: 0
RE: how
By GaryJohnson on 8/24/2009 9:22:25 AM , Rating: 3
RE: how
By ClownPuncher on 8/24/2009 12:26:08 PM , Rating: 1
Hooray for eyestrain and fatigue.


RE: how
By mircea on 8/24/2009 1:57:31 PM , Rating: 2
From my understanding, it all starts with the cameras.
They are based on the human eyes <-plural. The camera has two lenses that focus on the action just like a humans giving the depth perspective, thus 3D. The glasses are used to somehow block on your right eye the footage shot with the left lens of the camera and block your left from seeing the right lens footage, thus keeping the depth perspective the camera had during filming.
That's the reason you can't see how it works until you actually go and see it yourself.


RE: how
By monomer on 8/24/2009 6:35:21 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The glasses are used to somehow block on your right eye the footage shot with the left lens of the camera and block your left from seeing the right lens footage, thus keeping the depth perspective the camera had during filming.


That's the problem the OP was talking about. Wearing the glasses invariably gets uncomfortable due to eye-strain, or just plain irritation from wearing the glasses.

What will make 3D become viable is when some bright minds come up with a way for the TV to display 3D images without the use of polarized or shutter glasses.


"Can anyone tell me what MobileMe is supposed to do?... So why the f*** doesn't it do that?" -- Steve Jobs











botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki