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A now profitable Tesla motors hopes that a $49,900 Model S sedan will send its profit soaring to even greater heights.

The company is also launching the Roadster Sport model in 2011.  (Source: Tesla Motors)
After years of losses, the company's persistence is finally paying off

Luxury electric car maker Tesla Motors appears to be firing on all cylinders.  Despite a painful couple of years that saw the company cutting back to survive the recession, the company emerged stronger than ever.  Thanks to a new partnership with Daimler, additional engineering, distribution, and marketing resources were gained.  And most importantly, Tesla finally began to deliver vehicles.

Now the company can celebrate an important milestone -- its first profit.  After many months in the red, July saw the company in the black, making $1M USD in profit on $20M USD in revenue.  The profits came thanks to a record 109 cars shipped in the month.  Manufacturing cost cuts also helped to enable the profit.

Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk comments, "There is strong demand for a car that is unique in offering high performance with a clean conscience.  Customers know that in buying the Roadster they are helping fund development of our mass market electric cars."

Tesla, like many R&D driven greentech firms, offered a target date for profitability.  However, it appears that Tesla is one of the few to actually deliver on such a date -- having projected a profit in "mid-2009".

The Tesla Roadster undeniably features the most attractive production electric vehicle body design to date.  They also offer fittingly sporty performance and a utilitarian 244-mile range.  In other words, while expensive, the Roadsters do deliver a strong experience.  Currently, the Roadsters retail for a base price of $109,000.

Tesla has borrowed $465M USD from the U.S. Department of Energy, to produce a luxury sedan reachable by more customers at a price point of $49,900.  This new model will be called the Model S.

The company is also working with Daimler to create electric versions of the popular Smart car.  Late this year, the company will deploy a fleet of the 1,000 of the electrified ultra-compact vehicles.  Tesla is also set to deploy a higher-performance version of the Roadster -- the Roadster Sport -- in 2011.



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Just the begining
By mars2k on 8/10/2009 12:49:41 PM , Rating: 2
The experience these all electrics using batteries provide is just a stepping stone. In California and New York there are the beginings of the conversion to a hydrogen economy. These all electric cars could be produced with fuel cells and hydrogen tanks using the same drive train more than doubling the range. (the real world range not the hyped up 200+ mile figure)
Right now there are companies producing self contained units to produce and store hydrogen for fuel.
Running one of these with photovotaics will be the way to go in the not to distant future.




RE: Just the begining
By Penti on 8/10/2009 10:14:46 PM , Rating: 2
You would need like three times the electric energy though. Where are you gonna get that? Solar (wind) and nuclear power don't cut it for a hydrogen economy. Going from ~440 nuclear power plants to four, five thousands (that's high-temperature reactors with thermoelectric hydrogen production + electrolysis) just for road transportation would be silly. The >12 000 plants needed to replace all fossil fuels would just be retarded. A little country like Sweden would need 30 reactors to do something like that. It's a pipedream pretty much, it can't scale.


"If you look at the last five years, if you look at what major innovations have occurred in computing technology, every single one of them came from AMD. Not a single innovation came from Intel." -- AMD CEO Hector Ruiz in 2007














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