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Print 136 comment(s) - last by SiliconAddict.. on Jul 8 at 10:12 PM


What does the iPhone and vampires have in common? Both apparently can be killed by sunlight. Apple says that the following warning can occur when its phone gets exposed to sunlight.  (Source: Apple)
Apple finally responds to reports about its heat issues

Apple has been having plenty of headaches lately with its MacBook Pro displays failing and experiencing distortion.  Worse yet is the iPhone 3G S's quality problems, which include reported overheating and signal issues.  

The overheating was first noted in Apple support forums.  Soon, though, writers at several tech publications -- PC WorldWired, Le Journal Du Geek and The Telegraph -- began to notice the problems on their own phones.  The Le Journal Du Geek writer posted pictures of a white phone and noticed that the overheating was so severe that it colorized the plastic.  The heat tended to turn the case pink or brown.

Now, Apple has at last issued a response and it is assigning the blame for the problem on its users' behavior, sunlight, and on the seasons.  Apple says that leaving the device in a car on a hot day is one possible culprit causing its phone to overheat.  Apparently, like a vampire the phone is no friend of the sun --  Apple states that "leaving it in direct sunlight for extended amounts of time" may cause it to overheat.

Apple lists the use of "GPS tracking in a car on a sunny day or listening to music while in direct sunlight" as two particularly dangerous operations.

According to Apple the following problems are the result of the iPhone's overheating:

  • The device stops charging
  • Display dims
  • Weak cellular signal
  • Temperature warning screen appears with the message "iPhone needs to cool down before you can use it" (see image below)

Apple says that the iPhone is only meant to operate at temperatures between 0º and 35º C (32º to 95º F) and be stored at temperatures between -20º and 45º C (-4º to 113º F).  Unfortunately, this is much lower than the temperatures experienced in much of the American South and Southwest.

Based on Apple's stance it seems there's no immediate solution for iPhone owners.  Apple seems unwilling to agree that its hardware needs revision to deal with the problem, instead assigning the blame elsewhere -- the sun, heat, and summer weather.  And that means as summer temperatures heat up, users are left to prepare for the worst -- their phones beginning to fail.



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By Bateluer on 7/2/2009 10:29:07 AM , Rating: 3
Apple's quality has slid. Ironically, all of these overheating issues aren't difficult to fix and wouldn't affect the price tag of the final product because it's price has already been inflated.




By The0ne on 7/2/2009 10:35:07 AM , Rating: 2
This article cracked me up. I guess there are so many cases now they can't deny the claims. This is good news of course. The bad news is that their testing/quality didn't do their job and thus you have some crappy phones. Here's the basic routine to get your electronic products release (add more if you want),

1. FCC, EMC
2. Vibration/shock/temperature
3. Drop/Shipping test, if not included with #2
4. and your basic beta test :)

It seems they might have skimped on #2


By MrBlastman on 7/2/2009 10:47:53 AM , Rating: 3
I can attest to the American Southeast exceeding the recommended operating spec range. I wonder though if iEmployees are informing their customers of this "limitation" at purchase, especially in my area. Somehow I doubt they are.

It is impossible during the summer months, especially July and August, to maintain within safe operating spec througout the whole season. 95 degrees is the low end of the high for an average day here. It easily gets to be between 97 - 99 degrees on a daily basis, and our heat index is routinely 100 - 105 degrees.

That is a pretty lousy design for a mobile device having such a low ceiling for heat tolerance.

Thankfully I don't have to care - as I won't buy an iPhone to begin with. Thanks Apple for giving me more justification for my purchase avoidance!


By Bateluer on 7/2/2009 12:11:01 PM , Rating: 2
Heh, the high today for Phoenix is 108, with a much higher heat index. We're over 95 for 8 months out of the year, so I guess Phoenix residents can't use their iPhones.


By Sazar on 7/2/2009 1:48:21 PM , Rating: 2
Austin, Texas has had a heat-index of about 100-110 pretty much the whole of the last half of June. My 3G definitely gets warm but it is in an AC environment much of the day. If I do go out to the lake or live music or something, I don't use it much but I have never seen a heat-related error message before.

I wouldn't be a very happy camper if I did see one, considering summer temperatures average above 95F.


By ClownPuncher on 7/2/2009 1:56:40 PM , Rating: 3
In that heat, I would be too tired to call anyone anyway.


By superflex on 7/2/2009 2:12:02 PM , Rating: 5
But it's a dry heat.


By Boze on 7/2/2009 9:31:02 PM , Rating: 2
Knock it off Hudson!


By SpaceJumper on 7/2/2009 11:40:17 AM , Rating: 5
I agree 100%. iPhone is not design for use in the tropical climate. It would be fine at the North pole.
Apple can fix it by slapping on the back a 2 inches thick finned heatsink, that will fix the problem.
The problem is Apples' shoddy electrical-thermal engineering.


By donxvi on 7/2/2009 12:08:50 PM , Rating: 3
Actually, note that the lower limit of the operating temperature is only freezing and storage temp only goes down to -20C, -4F.

Looks like it would freeze up in a Canadian/Alaskan winter ! But it should be great at the north pole in summer...


By MonkeyPaw on 7/2/2009 1:57:23 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, Apple makes their products so cool looking that they forget to actually allow for the limitations of the components inside. Frank Lloyd Wright did similar things in the world of architecture--his buildings are aesthetically pleasing, but many of the construction materials he used are at or near their design limits. As a consequence, many of his buildings are falling apart. Apple does the same thing, only with thermal specs--it's not like iPhones are the only Apple products suffering from heat-stoke. At least it takes high temps to make the iPhone 3GS pass out--some of the Mac line manages to do it in climate-controlled environments!


By FaaR on 7/4/2009 1:14:04 AM , Rating: 1
My sneaking suspicion is you haven't the faintest clue as to the quality of Apple's electrical-thermal engineering, nor do you have any formal training in that field.

No, it sounds like you simply are another kiddie riding the jump-down-Apple's-throat bandwagon that does the rounds every time an article appears about some Apple gadget having issues...

Surprise for you and all the other whiners in this thread: no electronic device particulary likes high temperatures. News to you? Shouldn't be, it doesn't apply (no pun intended) only to Apple gadgets. And surprise number two: all makers of consumer electronics experience bad/failed devices, particulary with new models. What's there to talk about?

If you actually OWN a 3Ds - doesn't seem likely, considering your low opinion of its maker - and have issues with yellowing casing and whatnot, you can be comfortably assured by the fact you have a warranty on your new device.

And in the future, keep the phone in your pocket where it's comparatively cooler than out in the sun, and speak through it using a headset. You'd look like a right eejit anyway holding up a giant iPhone to your ear...


By SavagePotato on 7/4/2009 2:52:15 PM , Rating: 1
It's a good thing there are people like you that are so strongly in denial to purchase apples shit and keep them going.


By aj28 on 7/6/2009 2:07:11 AM , Rating: 2
In denial? He made a valid point. Hell, you didn't even manage valid grammar!


By dark matter on 7/4/2009 3:52:20 PM , Rating: 2
Dude, you know when they give you temps in the weather forcast it is the temps in the shade. So if you a sign on the weather map that says 36, that means your pocket will also be 36.

What an idiot you are.


By deltadeltadelta on 7/7/2009 12:20:56 PM , Rating: 2
No, I think all these folks "riding the jump-down-Apple's-throat bandwagon" are just tired of seeing Apple lauded for developing flawless products that never break. They are the ones who claim "it just works." I realize it is just advertising, but it misleads many consumers. This is part of Apple's growth spurt. They literally cannot have their cake (market share) and eat it too (avoid complaints). Law of large numbers or something.


By Jeffk464 on 7/2/2009 7:23:14 PM , Rating: 2
Apple probably doesn't want the expense of replacing all of the ones they have already sold.


By SiliconAddict on 7/8/2009 10:10:36 PM , Rating: 2
Apple has bad QA?!? I'm shocked I say shocked! This has never happened before! *rolls eyes*


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