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Apple observers noticed that CEO Steve Jobs' health dramatically decreased in 2008. Mr. Jobs reportedly has received a liver transplant and is currently recovering, eagerly awaiting a return to Apple at the month's end.  (Source: WSJ)
Apple's CEO and cofounder hopes to put his health problems behind him

Founding one of tech industry's biggest players -- Apple -- and personally turning the company around in the late nineties was nothing compared to the challenge that Apple CEO Steve Jobs faced in 2004.  Battling a rare and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, Mr. Jobs recovered thanks to surgery and reassumed his leadership role at the company, integrally helping to conceive, develop and release hit products such as the iPhone and MacBook Air.

Last year, though, many observers took note that Mr. Jobs looked sickly at public appearances.  Sure enough, in January of this year he took medical leave, announcing he would be gone from Apple on medical leave until the end of June.  In his absence Apple Chief Operating Officer Timothy Cook took over many of the day to day duties.

Now details of Mr. Jobs' medical battle, veiled in secrecy, have at last emerged.  According to a report by the Wall Street Journal Mr. Jobs received a liver transplant in Tennessee two months ago.  Mr. Jobs had earlier this year had relocated from California to Tennessee, a state known for having a shorter waiting list for organ transplants.  At the time Bloomberg had reported that Mr. Jobs was applying for a liver transplant.

Apple spokespeople contacted by the WSJ to seek confirmation of the sourced reports refused to comment, merely reiterating that Apple "continues to look forward to returning at the end of June, and there's nothing further to say."  According to the WSJ report, COO Cook may take over additional roles to help Mr. Jobs during his recovery.

Earlier this year it was discovered that Mr. Jobs was receiving hormone therapy.  Reportedly he was unable to digest food properly and receive nutrients.  The liver is an integral part of hormone production, and also produces bile, needed for digestion.  The liver is very sensitive to toxins, and can be damaged by chemotherapy, which Mr. Jobs likely received during his cancer treatment.

Liver transplant recipients have a 58 percent chance of surviving 15 years.  Liver transplants have been performed since 1967; the liver was the second organ to be successfully transplanted, with the kidneys being the first.

Mr. Jobs is currently 54.  Apple fans are eagerly awaiting his return, as he has always pushed the company and given it a creative spark.  Apple released its latest hot offering -- the iPhone 3G S -- this Friday.  Apple also announced new MacBook Pros, detailed its new OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard), and revealed Quicktime X.  Speculation has already begun that the company is preparing a major refresh to its iPod lineup for the fall.


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RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By mindless1 on 6/20/2009 1:07:16 PM , Rating: 1
So you're suggesting he was healthy in 2008?

Even with the successful surgery, 58% odds of 15 years isn't all that great, considering it also includes other recipients in better health and better able to recover and having a longer remainder of expected avg lifespan due to being younger.


RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By JKflipflop98 on 6/20/2009 1:20:28 PM , Rating: 2
That's the average. This guy has way more money than average.


RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By xphile on 6/21/2009 11:24:40 PM , Rating: 3
Average, below, or above average, none of it makes a damn difference if the man upstairs says your time is up, then that's it pal. All hed get for all that "wealth" is the best coffin money can buy, with the internal music being piped in from the latest ipod prototype that nobody's yet seen...


By Souka on 6/22/2009 5:41:47 PM , Rating: 3
Actually I suspect money will make him a better than %58 for 15yr survivability....given money being the only factor.

Plain simple truth... money does play an important part in receiving post transplant care. Those on just insurance are likely limited to what the insurance will pay for. Steve Jobs on the other hand, will likely seek better doctors...and medical care that the typical "joe-plumber" can have/afford...period.

This isn't for debate, it's just the cold hard truth.

My $.02


RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By Mitch101 on 6/20/2009 7:31:54 PM , Rating: 2
Im betting he jumped ahead of someone else who needed a liver transplant. I hope he compensates and at least appreciates whomever might pass away needing a liver transplant that didn't get one so Steve could.


RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By Samus on 6/20/2009 8:18:04 PM , Rating: 1
who's more important. joe bob from ford motors assembly line with 2 kids, or steve jobs, all mighty apple God?

that's for the liver to decide!


RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By Boze on 6/24/2009 12:38:23 AM , Rating: 2
Although you joke... I hate to be the hardened realist here... but the fact of the matter is, there are a lot of people alive on this planet today that could die tomorrow and in 100 years, its doubtful anyone will know they existed save for their tombstone.

I'm not saying Steve Jobs is the shining example of a life that I'd want to trade for another person's, but the simple fact is that as a species, some people are more important and useful than others.


By PandaBear on 6/29/2009 6:21:40 PM , Rating: 2
Steve Job is not more important that the other just because a few fan boy say so.


By icanhascpu on 6/21/2009 3:18:45 PM , Rating: 1
WHy would you people rate this kind of talk up? He's betting? Based on what? His hate for x corporation/the ceo? Give it a rest, its getting pathetic.


By Sunrise089 on 6/21/2009 9:44:20 PM , Rating: 2
Why should he compensate another prospective recipient even if this is true? Does Jobs have some obligation to the other people on the liver list? It's a simple matter of one saved life for another, but in this case if Jobs did something to "jump ahead" then perhaps the donor actually received some tangible reward.


By web2dot0 on 6/22/2009 7:04:33 PM , Rating: 3
You must be the same folks who thinks Rich people are all evil huh.
Everyone is entitled to gain wealth on equal footing. He wasn't born rich, so you had the same chance as Steve in making it to the top.

Give it up. Most rich people did something in their lives which made an impact on the society .... in a positive way. More than most ordinary folks. Get used to it.
There are always exceptions to the rule. You hear all this stories about rich folks abusing t heir power, which are true, but so are poor folks who rob and rape. It's no different.

The bottom line is until proven otherwise, he got the liver legit. What basis do you have to believe that he jumped the queue? Made he's been waiting for it long time ago and just recently "got to the top of the queue".

If he really wanted to "jump the queue", he could of easily got a liver in China or Russia anytime he wanted. It's obvious that he did not.

You're probably the same hypocrite that would jump the queue at a moment's notice if you had the same wealth.


RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By 91TTZ on 6/21/2009 9:44:27 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Even with the successful surgery, 58% odds of 15 years isn't all that great, considering it also includes other recipients in better health and better able to recover and having a longer remainder of expected avg lifespan due to being younger


Statistics like that are extremely misleading though. If a person gets a procedure that's normally performed on elderly people, the average lifespan after the procedure will be very low.

For example, if you were to find the average number of years that a person can expect to live after cataract surgery it'll probably be only a few years. That figure may scare a kid who needs the surgery. But that figure really has nothing to do with the surgery itself and more to do with the average age of people that get cataract surgery (mid 70's).


RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By glitchc on 6/21/2009 11:51:26 PM , Rating: 1
Just one problem with your analogy: Nobody reports life expectancy with cataract operations. Cataract risks are associated with loss of sight, not loss of life. A liver, on the other hand, is associated with loss of life, same as a heart, as both are fundamental to survival.


RE: "You can observe a lot just by watching."
By 91TTZ on 6/22/2009 9:22:00 AM , Rating: 2
Hence it being an analogy and not an actual example.


By glitchc on 6/30/2009 5:37:01 PM , Rating: 2
Well, it's a poor one since it has little relevance to the case at hand.


By myhipsi on 6/22/2009 11:02:53 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
Statistics like that are extremely misleading though. If a person gets a procedure that's normally performed on elderly people, the average lifespan after the procedure will be very low.


Actually, age is less of a factor than you might think. The reason for these statistics is that people who receive organ transplants have to take a cocktail of anti-rejection drugs for the rest of their lives. These drugs effectively nullify your immune system, which makes you succeptable to many diseases, viruses, and bacteria that can easily kill you without a well fuctioning immune system. Not only that but there's always a chance of the organ being rejected by the body (even with the drugs). So that is why there is a 58% odds of 15 years with a liver transplant.


"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer














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