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T-Mobile's servers have been compromised, but unsure of how much damage was caused

T-Mobile has confirmed it recently suffered a data breach in which hackers compromised the company's servers and reportedly copied customer information.

An anonymous post published on the Full Disclosure security mailing list with the following message:  "We have everything -- their databases, confidential documents, scripts and programs from their servers, financial documents up to 2009," according to the Full Disclosure post.

The poster offered the information to T-Mobile competitors, who weren't interested in the information, and is now willing to sell it to the highest bidder available.

"We already contacted with their competitors and they didn't show interest in buying their data -- probably because the mails got to the wrong people -- so now we are offering them for the highest bidder," the post claims.

T-Mobile is looking into the matter to try and identify whether or not the hacker actually walked away with information that can be sold to a T-Mobile competitor.

"We've identified the document from which information was copied, and believe possession of this alone is not enough to cause harm to our customers," T-Mobile said in a statement.  "Customers can be assured if there is any evidence that customer information has been compromised, we would inform those affected as quickly as possible."

Some security experts have come forward to say they believe the post on the Full Disclosure forum is nothing more than a hoax, saying it's unlikely someone would go through the trouble of compromising T-Mobile's servers to gain information without a buyer already identified.

At least one security expert said that even though companies routinely have their databases breached with information taken, it's rare that the people responsible publicly discuss the matter.  Security experts and analysts are curious to learn how serious the data breach was, and if any T-Mobile subscribers face possible identity theft because of the intrusion.



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By johnfranks999 on 6/10/2009 2:55:12 PM , Rating: 2
In the realm of risk, unmanaged possibilities become probabilities: These data breaches and thefts are due to a lagging business culture. As CIO, I'm always looking for ways to help my team, business teams, and ad hoc measures of various vendors, contractors and internal team members. A book that is required reading (specific chapters, depending on nature of projects) is "I.T. Wars: Managing the Business-Technology Weave in the New Millennium." It has a great chapter regarding security (among others).

We keep a few copies kicking around - it would be a bit much to expect outside agencies to purchase it on our say-so. But, particularly when entertaining bids for projects, we ask potential solutions partners to review relevant parts of the book, and it ensures that these agencies understand our values and practices.

The author, David Scott, has an interview here that is a great exposure: http://businessforum.com/DScott_02.html

The book came to us as a tip from one of our interns who attended a course at University of Wisconsin, where the book is in use; I like to pass along things that work, in the hope that good ideas continue to make their way to me. I hope you can make use of this info...




"If you look at the last five years, if you look at what major innovations have occurred in computing technology, every single one of them came from AMD. Not a single innovation came from Intel." -- AMD CEO Hector Ruiz in 2007











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